Prairie landscaping suits Lake Panorama resident
Plants and grasses attract a wide variety of insects and butterflies.

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

In 2012, Tammy Deal was having an Arts and Crafts style bungalow built on two timbered lots near Helen’s Cove when she noticed an abundance of deer in the area.

“I knew I was going to need to work with nature if I wanted to keep the deer from ruining my landscaping,” Deal says. “I started researching native prairie plants and found a couple companies on the Internet where I could order bare root plants. I planted some in the fall of 2013, and, to my surprise, they came up the next spring.”

Her next step was to connect with two Iowa State University senior landscape design students. Together they created a landscape plan to surround her new home with a variety of native plants, and she continued to add new plants to match the plan.

Five years ago, Scott and Becky Rolfes moved to Lake Panorama. Scott had just retired, after spending the last 40 years as a natural resource specialist with the Army Corps of Engineers at Saylorville Lake, working mainly to establish native plantings.

In retirement, Scott started his own business — Scott’s Native Landscaping. Deal tells the story of being behind a pickup and seeing a bumper sticker with his company name and phone number on it and snapping a picture for future use. She hadn’t gotten around to calling Rolfes when they met while playing pickleball with others in Panora.

Since then, Rolfes has been helping Deal refine and expand her native prairie landscape. Each fall, Rolfes mows down the prairie flowers and grasses that have grown throughout the summer, then burns the remaining mulch.

“Especially when a prairie is being established, it needs to be burned annually,” Rolfes says. “The flowers always bloom brighter the next year.”

Deal built her house on a “B” lot, and later purchased a nearby “A” lot, which gives her water access on Helen’s Cove. The two lots combined cover 38,000 square feet, giving her plenty of space to experiment with native plantings.

“In the front of the house, there are more tallgrass prairie plants and flowers. There is greater diversity, with perhaps 40 to 50 plant species there,” Rolfes says. “As you move toward the south side and back, the trees mean less sunshine, so the types of plants there become fewer.”

Deal and Rolfes are restoring an oak savanna between her house and waterfront dock, reached by a winding path through the woods.

“I like knowing some of the oak trees there were alive when Abraham Lincoln was president,” Deal says.

A savanna involves grasses growing under large trees, with the trees spaced further apart than would be the case in a forest.

“These naturally occurring landscapes were along the Raccoon River where the prairie met the forests associated with a river valley,” says Rolfes. “These very open forests, or savannas, were dominated by burr oaks and other trees that are most tolerant to prairie fires. Remnants of the oak savannas are all around Lake Panorama.”

Some native plants were in the area where large burr oaks stand on Deal’s property, but there was too much shade for them to thrive. Selected trees have been removed to allow more light to reach the ground. This area will be burned for the first time this fall, which will help eliminate shrubbery, poison ivy and other undesirable plants while encouraging native plants to grow.

“Native prairie plants require minimal care while still being visually attractive,” says Rolfes. “You remove weeds and apply mulch in the spring. No chemicals are used, which makes it perfect for use around the lake. Once you get native plants established, there isn’t much to do.”

The wide variety of plants and grasses attracts a wide variety of insects and butterflies. But what about the deer? Deal and Rolfes say deer still browse on native plants, although they avoid some. Even if deer like a plant, they don’t kill it because the seeds fall out and new plants grow.

Deal clearly is enjoying learning about and growing native plants.

“There are so many resources available. I think it is interesting and fun,” she says. “But it may take some getting used to for people who are accustomed to more conventional landscaping.”

LPN Junior Golf School teaches fundamentals
Thirty-seven participants, divided into three age groups, take part.

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

As with many things, COVID-19 forced a change in the way the 2020 Lake Panorama National Junior Golf School operated. Because of the need for social distancing, two sessions with three weeks each were offered, and no final event was held at Panorama West.

Young people ages 5 to 17 are eligible to attend the school. This year there were 37 participants, with 19 in the first session the first three weeks of July, and 18 in the second session the following three weeks.
During the school, juniors learn full swing, pitching, chipping and putting fundamentals along with golf etiquette and rules of golf. Participants are divided into three age groups and rotate between the putting green, chipping area and driving range. At the end of the hour, the juniors head to Spikes to choose a free drink.

The school was led by Michael Kleinwolterink, LPN pro shop manager. Assisting were Gary Babcock, LPN head golf professional, plus several past and current players from the Panorama High School boys golf team — Will Babcock, Dylan Douglass, Kolby Shackelford and Ryan Klinge. David Van Ahn, coach of the Panorama boys golf team, also volunteered his time for the junior golfers.

The Junior School has two sponsors that have supported the school for many years — the Lake Panorama Association (LPA) and Guthrie County State Bank (GCSB).

“LPA and LPN are proud to support junior golf,” says John Rutledge, LPA general manager and LPN director of operations. “We view it as our opportunity to grow the game of golf. There’s nothing better than seeing two or three generations of golfers enjoying our Lake Panorama courses.”

“Guthrie County State Bank is proud to continue our investment in the Lake Panorama National Junior Golf Program,” says Mike Underwood, GCSB president and CEO. “Over the years, we’ve witnessed the commitment of the LPN staff to this program. These dedicated golf professionals and staff ensure the junior golfers not only learn golf technique, but, more importantly, they learn course etiquette and the professional demeanor the game of golf requires. We believe these skills are transferrable to many aspects of life.”

Sponsorship funds made it possible to give each junior golfer a cloth backpack, a $10 LPN gift card and a certificate for a free round of golf at Panorama West.

New owners for Lake Panorama Realty

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

The ownership of Lake Panorama Realty in Panora has changed hands. Effective July 13, Bob Nevitt sold the real estate company to Kane and Dee Powell. Nevitt will continue to own and operate Nevitt Real Estate in Perry.

The Powells have lived in the Lake Panorama area since 2000.

“We have raised our five children here and enjoy living in a small community,” says Dee Powell. “The opportunity arose for us to acquire Lake Panorama Realty, and it was the logical progression since we have been in the residential and commercial building industry for so many years.”

Kane Powell will continue to run Paradigm LLC, his building and electrical company. Dee Powell, who earned her real estate license earlier this year, will manage the day-to-day operations of Lake Panorama Realty.

In addition to Dee, the Lake Panorama Realty team continues to include Julie Wykoff as managing broker and John McDermott and Lee Anne Howe as sales associates.

Lake Panorama Realty is independently owned by the Powells and located at 505 E. Main St. in Panora, next to Guthrie County State Bank.

The Powells say they are looking forward to sustaining and growing the reputation and standing that Lake Panorama Realty has built over many years.

New debris skimmer arrives
The $400,000 piece of equipment will replace the skimmer LPA purchased more than 20 years ago.

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

When the Middle Raccoon River rises because of heavy rains or snow melt, it doesn’t just bring more water to Lake Panorama; it brings debris. For many years, LPA staff and members would spend days, or even weeks, tracking down and removing debris from the lake after a heavy rain.

Attempts to stop debris at the upper basin began in 1990 with the development of a structure to keep debris from entering the lake. Various improvements to both the type of structure and the placement have been made since then with increasing levels of success.

Improvements also have been made in the equipment designed to remove debris from above the trap, as well as throughout the lake if the trap fails or isn’t in place. Such was the case this spring, when the lake still was covered in ice, and the trap hadn’t yet been deployed. A surge of water as the ice went out brought debris into the lake.

In June 1999, the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ) purchased a new trash skimmer, to skim small logs and branches from the lake. In 2009, a special-order utility barge was a joint purchase between LPA and RIZ. A boom mounted on the barge accommodates a grapple attachment to remove logs from the water.

A new and larger debris skimmer was delivered to Lake Panorama July 17. RIZ purchased the $400,000 piece of equipment, which will replace the skimmer LPA purchased more than 20 years ago. The original skimmer will be retained and serve as a backup or as a second unit for large events.

Mike Monthei, LPA maintenance supervisor, says the new debris skimmer is bigger, faster and holds more debris.

“When the gates on the front open, it is 16 feet wide,” says Monthei. “It will gather debris on a conveyor belt system that moves it to the back of the skimmer for storage. Once it is full, we will back it up to an elevated conveyor on shore and unload the debris into dump trucks.”

Monthei said the old skimmer could hold one small truckload of material, while the new one will hold three times that amount.

“The speed of this skimmer on the water is important, especially when there is a debris event in Burchfield Cove. In the past, debris coming in that way would scatter all over the lake before our old skimmer could even get there,” he said. “This skimmer is must faster in the water.”

LPA’s goal is for the boom at the north end of the upper basin to hold debris upstream, giving the maintenance staff time to collect and dispose of it before it gets into the lake.

Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors Meeting

Posted 8/11/20
June 30, 2020
LPN Conference Center

The Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors met June 30, 2020, at 5 p.m., at the LPN Conference Center. Board members in attendance were Mary Jane Carothers, Emily Donovan, Gary Evans, David Finneseth, Rich Schumacher and Jim Spradling.
LPA Staff in attendance: Danna Krambeer and John Rutledge.
Visitors in attendance:  None
President Carothers called the meeting to order at 5 p.m.

Agenda Item 1 – Approval of the Agenda  
Spradling moved to approve the agenda. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 2 – Open Forum – No one present for open forum

Agenda Item 3 – Consent Agenda
Rutledge informed the board there were two typographical corrections to committee reports.
Spradling moved to approve the consent agenda with the noted corrections. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Consent agenda to include:
a) LPA General Manager’s Report
b) Approval of minutes from 05.26.2020 LPA Board Meeting
c) Acceptance of 05.31.2020 consolidated financial report – LPA & LPN, LLC
d) Accept minutes of the 06.15.2020 Water Safety Committee meeting
e) Accept minutes of the 06.08.2020 Building Code Committee meeting
f) Accept minutes from 05.18.2020 LPN LLC Board of Managers meeting
g) Approve date of the next LPA board of directors meeting
Agenda Item 4a – Variance Request: Brian Stoufer, Lot 640, shoreline setback as recommended by Building Codes committee   Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Brian Stoufer (lot 640) presented plans to the committee asking for a variance to rebuild and add on to a storage shed. The shed sits back 38 feet from the shoreline. Brian wanted to re-do the siding on the shed to make it more appealing. He also wanted to add 2 feet to the length of the shed along with a deck. After discussion, the committee decided that the additional length of the building was fine, as it still met the square footage requirements. The committee decided no roof should be allowed to be built over the deck, as a roof would deem the area underneath as part of the structure, therefore exceeding the square footage requirements. Schumacher made a motion to allow the remodel, extension and deck addition to the storage shed on lot 640 (with no roof to be built over the deck portion) in its current location, which is 38 feet from the shoreline. Motion seconded by Gary Evans and carried unanimously.
Schumacher moved to approve granting a variance to allow the remodel, extension and deck addition to the storage shed on lot 640, Brian Stoufer, (with no roof to be built over the deck portion) in its current location, which is 38 feet from the shoreline. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4b – Variance Request: Kent Miller, Lot 1177 roadside setback as recommended by Building Codes committee   
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Kent Miller (lot 1177) proposed a garage addition next to his home that would require a 10-foot setback. The home on the lot already sits 10 feet closer to the road and the garage addition would be built parallel with the existing house. Westercamp made a motion to approve a 10-foot road setback variance for lot 1177, pending approval of plans from either Lane Rumelhart or Michael Gliem. Motion seconded by Knudsen and carried unanimously.
Donovan moved to approve a 10-foot roadside lot setback variance for lot 1177, Kent Miller, pending approval of plans by LPA staff. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4c – Variance Request: Jacqueline De Maria Trust (Kevin and Jacqueline Wellik), Lots 4059 - 4062 combined, roadside setback as recommended by Building Codes committee   
Lots 4059 & 4060 are in process of closing from LPA and will be combined with currently owned lots 4061 & 4062.
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Kevin Wellik (representing Jacqueline De Maria Trust lots 4060 and 4059) asked for a 20-foot road setback variance to build a garage. Wellik wanted the variance to avoid the steep topography of the lot, minimize tree removal and prepare for a future driveway. The committee decided that allowing this structure would make the garage seem more likely to be a part of the property instead of having it back and down the steep grade. Based on neighbor’s approval and pleasing aesthetics, Westercamp made a motion to approve a 20-foot road setback variance for garage construction on lots 4059 and 4060. The motion was seconded by Powell and carried unanimously.
Spradling moved to approve a 20-foot road setback variance for garage construction on lots 4059 & 4060, Jacqueline De Maria Trust. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4d – Variance Request: Jim and Sue Davidson, Lot 622, roof pitch for minority percentage of roof as recommended by Building Codes committee   
A permit request from Jim and Sue Davidson was submitted after the building codes committee meeting. Most of the roof pitch is compliant, with a few transitional sections being non-compliant.
Through emails, the building codes committee discussed this with two conclusions:
Davidson’s roof complies with the intent of the rule. The variances requested are very minor in scope. A variance approval is recommended for the June Board meeting.
The committee is preparing a rule adjustment for July, which will give LPA staff the ability to approve permits for which a majority percentage of the roof is compliant. This will eliminate the need for variances that address minor “eyebrows” and “crickets” that are technically non-compliant but routinely achieve variances from the LPA. Initial discussion is leaning toward allowing a roof to be considered “compliant” by LPA staff if 90 percent of the roof meets the pitch requirements.
Evans moved to approve a roof pitch variance for Lot 622, Jim and Sue Davidson, as presented in their building plans. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4e – Sale of lot 8010
The land sales committee reviewed an offer to purchase lot 8010 for $12,500. The land sales committee collectively decided to counter at $15,000. Buyer accepted the counteroffer of $15,000 for the lot, offer contingent on a perc test and the purchase of lot 866 from Mercados. The perc test was completed on June 26 and is acceptable to buyer. Buyer also requests a septic easement to run under the road from lot 866 to lot 8010; they are directly across from each other.
LPA staff has reviewed the lot and has no objection to the sale of this lot. The land sales committee recommends accepting the offer of $15,000, with the addition of the septic easement.
Schumacher moved to accept the offer of $15,000 to sell lot 8010 to Michael and Sara Luft, and to approve execution of an easement for septic to be bored under the road from Lot 866 to Lot 8010, cost of easement preparation, $300 to be paid by buyer. Easement to be drafted by LPA attorney. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4f – Sale of Lot 3083 & 3084
The land sales committee reviewed an offer to purchase lots 3083 & 3084 for $25,000 for the two lots. The land sales committee collectively decided to counter at $30,000 for the two lots. Buyer accepted the counteroffer of $30,000 for the two lots.
LPA staff has reviewed the lots and has no objection to the sale of these lots. The land sales committee recommends accepting the offer of $30,000. There will be some savings in selling the two lots together, and this appears to be a good price with all considerations.
Evans moved to accept the offer of $30,000 to sell lots 3083 & 3084 to James Albert. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4g – LPA Committee appointments
The board discussed the General Manager’s recommendation for committee appointments and Board members for each committee. Rutledge noted the board would need to select two members of the board of directors to serve each committee.
Building Committee   Term Expires
John Miller - 2023
Dirk Westercamp - 2023
Rod Knudsen - 2023
Kent Brown - 2022
Ken Powell - 2022
Nate Esser - 2021
Richard Schumacher - LPA Board Member
Gary Evans - LPA Board Member
Evans moved to approve the building committee member appointments, as listed with term dates. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Water Safety Committee   Term Expires
Therese McConeghey - 2023
Todd Nevenhoven - 2023
Dale Behrends - 2022
Todd Hyde - 2022
Mike Appleseth - 2021
Chad Tope - 2021
Lyn Coulter      
Marina Tenant (Continuous)
Emily Donovan - Board Member
Jim Spradling - Board Member
Schumacher moved to approve the water safety committee member appointments, as listed with term dates. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Land Sales Committee    Term Expires
Bob Batschelet - 2023
Kathleen DeLucca - 2023
Maureen Lubeck - 2022
Tom Jeschke - 2022
Charles Schnack - 2021
Rich Schumacher - Board Member
Dave Finneseth - Board Member
Spradling moved to approve the land sales committee member appointments, as listed with term dates. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Appeals Committee     Term Expires
Pam Johnson - 2023
Andy Harrelson - 2023
Linda Reis - 2022
John McDermott - 2022
Mindy Larsen Poldberg - 2021
Schumacher moved to approve the appeals committee member appointments, as listed with term dates. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 5 – Old Business - None

Agenda Item 6 – Closed Session – The board entered closed session at 5:49 p.m. to discuss legal matters. The board exited closed session at 5:54 p.m.
Donovan moved to approve a confidential legal agreement, as discussed in closed session. Document to be drafted by LPA attorney and execution by LPA general manager. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 7a – Election of Officers
Carothers asked for nominations of officers.
Spradling moved to nominate the following slate of officers, to take effect upon adjournment of the June 30, 2020 board meeting:
President Mary Jane Carothers
Vice President Rich Schumacher
Secretary Emily Donovan
Treasurer Gary Evans
Motion seconded.
Carothers asked for any discussion or other nominations. With no further discussion or other nominations presented, Carothers called for the vote. Motion carried unanimously.

Adjourn - With no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 5:55 p.m. 

Security camera installed at marina ramp
Goal is to ease concerns about unauthorized use of the boat ramp.

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

A security camera has been installed at Coulter’s Marina, positioned to record boats both as they are launched and also pulled out of the water at the ramp.

The Iowa Supreme Court ruled this past January the waters of Lake Panorama are public, and subject to enforcement by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The ruling also noted the land surrounding Lake Panorama is privately controlled, and clarified the Lake Panorama Association and its membership has no obligation to allow access to the water.

“As we’ve always known, Lake Panorama is a de-facto private lake despite the fact it is one and the same with the Middle Raccoon River,” says John Rutledge, LPA general manager. “We expect no changes in how LPA operates but certainly answered a lot of questions based upon social media posts and speculation that Lake Panorama was now ‘open to all.’ ”

The new camera at the marina will help ease concerns about unauthorized use of the boat ramp there.

“We are working on improved signage near the ramp and continue to rely on our close partnership with Coulters for oversight of the boat ramp,” Rutledge says. “Our main focus is to see how many boats come and go during hours when Coulters is closed. We also will be using the camera to help ensure boats launched there adhere to LPA rules regarding invasive species.”

Anniversary celebration

ReShape Fitness Studio celebrated its second anniversary on July 10.

GCSB launches $50,000 matching donation program for AC/GC Strength & Conditioning

Posted 8/11/20

GUTHRIE CENTER — In a final push to complete an energized fundraising effort to raise $160,000 for equipment for the new AC/GC fitness center, Guthrie County State Bank (GCSB) announced a $50,000 matching donation program. GCSB will match every dollar donated up to $25,000 until the $50,000 goal is reached.

AC/GC Community Schools will soon have a state of the art fitness center for students and the community to invest in their health and physical fitness. While the school district financed the construction of the building, the activities department was tasked with raising the $160,000 needed to equip the building with weights, machines, turf, and workout equipment. Activities Director Cody Matthewson has spearheaded the fundraising effort from zero to the $110,000 mark. GCSB’s goal is to motivate community members, alumni and friends to finish out the campaign.

“This new fitness facility is an investment in the future of our students, staff and community,” said Mike Underwood, president and CEO of Guthrie County State Bank. “Beyond athletics, this will be a place of community connection. Healthy residents make a healthy community, which is a key component of economic vitality. We’re proud to help AC/GC make the final push to complete their fundraising.”

Students and community members frequenting the AC/GC fitness center will enjoy a spacious modern facility with free weights, cardio equipment and access to the gymnasium. Matthewson noted that this summer the AC/GC Charger Strength and Conditioning program has averaged more than 100 students per day.

“The support from the AC/GC community for this facility and for the equipment fundraising has been outstanding,” said Matthewson. “We are thankful to Guthrie County State Bank for its leadership in making the push for the last $50,000. You can feel the excitement of our students each day as they imagine the future strength and conditioning workouts in the new facility.”


How to donate
For every dollar donated, GCSB will donate a matching dollar. As an example, a donation of $50 becomes a $100 donation. That means donations of $50 by 500 people will reach the goal of $50,000 through the matching program. Donations can be made in a variety of ways:

Drop off your donation in the drive-through at Guthrie County State Bank.

Mail your donation to: AC/GC School District, ATTN: Equipment, 906 School St., Guthrie Center, Iowa, 50115

Donate online at https://www.gofundme.com/f/acgc-weight-roomfitness-center

For more information, visit Charger Strength on Facebook or Guthrie County State Bank’s website. 

Calendar of Events Aug. 12-Sept. 14, 2020

Posted 8/11/2020

Aug. 12, Aug. 13, Aug. 17, Aug. 19, Aug. 20, Aug. 24, Aug. 26, Aug. 27
Water aerobics

Lake Panorama National Resort pool. Water aerobics classes are offered every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. Classes begin at 9:30 a.m., are led by volunteers, and are free of charge. Those who haven’t purchased an annual LPN pool membership will need to pay the $3 daily fee at the LPN pro shop before entering the pool. If you like, bring a pool noodle. For those who do not have a pool noodle, some are available for pickup from the LPN Fitness Center before class begins. These noodles are used at your own risk. No signup needed. www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 13-16
Irv Gerlich Memorial Ryder Cup

LPN Golf Course www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 14, Aug. 28
Fore Fun Friday Couples

Registration at 4:30 p.m., shotgun at 5 p.m.
Panorama West Golf Course. Two-Couple Scramble with a Just-For-Fun Golf Game. $1 per couple. Non-members of Panorama West will need to pay green fees, and anyone needing a cart, call the clubhouse at 641-755-2250 to reserve. Please respect others’ space when interacting. The game will be sent via email a couple of days prior to play, no paper copies. The Ebys will draw cards for pairings and hole assignments at 4:55 p.m. After play, circle golf carts safely spaced in the parking lot to enjoy conversation. No sharing of snacks and beverages, but feel free to bring your own. Call Bill & Karen Eby at 515- 480-4633 with questions. www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 21
Varsity Football: Panorama vs. Ogden

7 p.m. Panorama Community School www.panoramaschools.org

Aug. 22
Panorama West Golf Course

Kim Lubeck Memorial Golf Tournament, Sponsored by Panora Lions Club, 12 p.m. registration, 1 p.m. shotgun start, $160 / Team (Members Receive $10 Off). Includes 18 holes of golf with a grab and go meal.  For more information or to register contact the Panorama West clubhouse at 641-755-2250 or email maggliem@netins.net. Proceeds go to Panora Lions Club causes.
www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 24
First day of school, K-12

www.panoramaschools.org

Aug. 24
Panora City Council Meeting

6:30 p.m. www.cityofpanora.com

Aug. 24, Aug. 31
Nine & Wine Couples

Lake Panorama National Golf Course, Panorama West Golf Course. 4 Person Best Shot. Teams will be assigned at each week’s event by blind draw. LPN Member - $75 / Panorama West Member - $180 (includes green fees and carts). Weekly prizes will be awarded and a series MVP prize will be awarded for couples with lowest ranked finishes in all events. Wine and dinner available in the Links restaurant after golf. Call the LPN pro shop with any questions or to register at 641-755-2024. www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 25
LPA Board Meeting

5 p.m. Lake Panorama National Conference Center www.lakepanorama.org

Aug. 26
Men’s League Shoot-out

3 p.m. Lake Panorama National Golf Course www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug. 25
Varsity Volleyball: Panorama vs. Interstate 35     

7 p.m. Panorama High School www.panoramaschools.org
            
Aug. 27
Women’s League Shoot-out

5:30 p.m. LPN Golf Course www.lakepanoramanational.com

Aug 27
Varsity Volleyball: Panorama vs. Earlham High School

7 p.m. Panorama High School www.panoramaschools.org
                
Aug. 28
Varsity Football: Panorama vs. Grundy Center

7 p.m. Panorama High School www.panoramaschools.org

Sept. 1
Varsity Volleyball: Panorama vs. Ogden     

7 p.m. Panorama High School www.panoramaschools.org

Sept. 8
Deadline for Building Code Variance Requests

www.lakepanorama.org

Sept. 11
Varsity Football: Panorama vs. Van Meter

7 p.m. Panorama High School www.panoramaschools.org

Sept. 14
Panorama School Board Meeting

6:30 p.m. Board Room www.panoramaschools.org

Submit your free items for the Lake Panorama Times calendar of events at https://www.lakepanoramatimes.com/contact-us
Event dates and times are subject to change. Contact hosts for updated details.

Courtney Allen celebrates 93 years

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

Courtney Allen has a long history at Lake Panorama. He was a stockholder in Mid-Iowa Lakes in about 1965, bought his first lot in 1969, and traded it in 1971 for the one where his home now stands north of Sunset Beach. He and his wife Dilma, who he has been married to more than 65 years, built their home in 1980 and moved here permanently in 1984 when they sold their home in Urbandale.

Allen’s 93rd birthday was June 25. He has been playing in the Thursday morning men’s league at Panorama West for many years.

“I thought it would be fun to have a party for myself with my best friends, many of whom I have played with for years,” Allen says.

“I worked it out with the gals in the pro shop to have plenty of coffee, and I supplied lots of bakery products. I also said I would pay for any ice cream, candy and pop for anyone else who played the course the rest of the day,” he says. “Everyone was surprised and helped me celebrate my new age with good cheer.”

Allen is from Massachusetts and Dilma from Curacao. After college, he went to work for HyLine Poultry Farm in 1950. He stayed there 21 years before starting his own company, Sunnytime, Inc., in 1971. He sold that business to Cargill in 1987 and moved to Minnesota to operate the total egg operation until he turned 65.

The couple retired and moved back to enjoy their Lake Panorama home. It was badly damaged by a tornado in 2014, but they rebuilt it and are enjoying life there.

“We love Guthrie County and all its people,” Allen says.

As for his birthday, Allen said, “You can quote me as saying it was the best birthday I have had in years, but I’m looking forward to the next one.”

Ask Lake Panorama Times
If you’ve got questions, we’ll find the answers.

Posted 8/11/20
Q: How do I get one of those blue and white dock signs with my address?
A:
A dock sign can be ordered anytime for $25 through the Lake Panorama Association website. This is the official way to comply with LPA sign uniformity rules and Iowa DNR dock regulations that require street address and dock permit number displayed on member docks. The signs are reflective, which assists visibility for those navigating at night. To order a dock sign, go to the LPA’s website and complete the form. Either scan it and email it to lpa@lakepanorama.org or mail it or drop it off at the LPA office (P.O. Box 157, 5006 Panorama Drive, Panora, IA 50216) with a check for $25 for each sign.

Q: What is the maximum length of a boat that can be on Lake Panorama?
A:
No single-hulled boat (non-pontoon) can exceed 24 feet in length including the swim platform. Measurement is made from the forwardmost tip of the bow to the end of the swim platform (if so equipped) or the stern (if no swim platform.) No pontoon vessel can exceed 27 feet in length measured from the forward-most tip of the pontoon to the end of the swim platform, if so equipped, or rear of the pontoon.

Q: I am seeing a blue-green algae bloom. Should I be concerned?
A:
Dry weather and clear water have created ideal conditions for a “bloom” of blue-green algae or cyanobacteria. At first, levels of the algae will appear as a light greenish tinge to the lake water. As the population increases, the water may turn a “Kool-Aid” green. White, green, blue-green, or reddish-brown suds/scum will float to the surface in calm areas of the lake, such as the marina and small coves. Blooms most often appear on the downwind side of the lake after several days of a steady breeze. LPA will continue to test for microcystin concentrations in blue-green algae blooms. To-date, NO microcystin tests at Lake Panorama have approached the prescribed thresholds for safety warnings. Swimming or water recreation activities such as water skiing, wake surfing or tubing should be avoided in areas of heavy bloom. The algae can be an irritant to skin and water spray containing lots of algae can be breathed in and irritate the lungs. Small children should also be kept out of algae blooms, as they can unknowingly drink the water. Dogs are especially susceptible to severe illness (or death) if they drink water infested with blue-green algae. If conditions look scummy or the water appears like paint, swimming and water recreation should be avoided. Shower after water recreation. Don’t allow water contact or allow your pets to drink the water. Keep small children and anyone with immune-deficiency issues or allergies out of the water and away from the spray while boating.

LPN WOMEN’S LEAGUE RAISES NEARLY $5,000 FOR TORI’S ANGELS
Foundation’s namesake is Tori Heckman, who had life-saving heart surgery in 2011 at the age of 5 after several other heart surgeries.

Posted 8/11/20
By Susan Thompson
Lake Panorama Times

On July 9, the usual Lake Panorama National women’s league night turned into a Rally for Tori’s Angels. The result was a donation of $4,903 being presented to the foundation, which provides financial support to Iowa children with life-threatening medical challenges.

This is the third year for this event. The evening included a nine-hole, four-gal best-shot tournament. Great weather led to 44 players for the event, and games on most holes led to a low score of 29 for the winning team. Winning team members were Kathy Moline, Shanell Wagler, Shelby Lewis and Maggie Armstrong.

The foundation’s namesake is Tori Heckman, who had life-saving heart surgery in 2011 at the age of 5 after several other heart surgeries. The foundation recently accepted its 71st child for assistance.

After golf there was a silent auction and a presentation by Tori’s grandmother, Jackie Wicks, of Panora. She talked about Tori turning 15 years old, current children sponsored by Tori’s Angels and the challenges the foundation has faced this year with fundraising because of COVID-19. In 2019, Tori’s Angels took on 22 new children. So far in 2020, four children have been approved for sponsorship, and seven fundraising events have been canceled due to the virus.

 Money raised at the LPN women’s league July 9 event included the purchase of donated silent auction items and a freewill donation bucket. The rest of the funds collected were from individual donations. LPN women’s league leaders say they’re already planning for the fourth annual Tori’s Angels fundraiser sometime during the 2021 golf season.

Donations can be mailed at any time to Tori’s Angels Foundation, 4677 Panorama Drive, Panora, Iowa, 50216.

Lake Dogs and Cove Cats

Posted 8/11/20
By Cheryl Temple
Lake Panorama Times


Lake Dog
Gracie

9 months old
Petite Goldendoodle
Owners: Brian and Lisa Wegener (Pictured grandsons Rylen and Rees)

Gracie enjoys whipped cream, sprinklers, snow, golf carts, boat rides, her “babies” (stuffed animal toys), spinning in circles with her rope toy, and going for walks. Gracie is an energetic, happy puppy who seems to love everyone.

Cove Cat
Butterball

9 years old
Owner: Tamara Deal

Butterball came from a barnyard near Bagley. A little girl named her, and the name stuck. The previous owners were worried that she would be ran over by farm machinery. As for owners, does anyone ever really own a cat? But, Butterball would definitely claim that she lives with Tamara.

Butterball receives a weekly bath because it has allergies. Yes, it is possible to bathe a cat.

Butterball has a doggy sibling, a standard poodle, and did not appear to be happy when the puppy came to live with them The dog is now 7.5 years old, and when Butterball gets mad at her, she chases her around the house. All 8 pounds of her will attack the 50-pound dog.

Butterball likes to eat, be held and sleep — in that order.


Panora Pets is a non-profit rescue consisting of several volunteers like Tim Randall and George Jones, providing shelter and services for cats in need in the Panora area. Stop in and visit the beautiful kitties and hopefully take one home. Through contributions from the community and beyond, P.E.T.S maintains its dedication to animals in need. 

Blue-Green Algae

It’s that time of year again all over the freshwater lakes and ponds of the Midwest. Weather and water conditions are producing a “bloom” of blue-green algae or cyanobacteria. Warm weather, low rainfall, dissolved nutrients and clear water have combined to start a rapid increase in algae population. The primitive one-celled plants have always been around, but certain conditions cause the population to increase.

At first, levels of the algae will appear as a light greenish tinge to the lake water. As the population increases, the water may turn a "Kool-Aid" green and white, green, or blue green suds or scum will float to the surface in quiet areas such as the marina, small coves and other spots where boats do not stir the water or the wind can't blow it away. The scum looks unappetizing and is sometimes mistaken for sewage because there can be an unpleasant, sulphurous odor accompanying the bloom. The floating material is usually white, blue-white, blue-green, or green, but sometimes can be a reddish brown. Usually it is more evident in coves or shallow areas and often appears the worst on the downwind side of the lake after several days of strong breezes.

When to Take Precautions
Swimming or water recreation activities such as water skiing or tubing should be avoided in areas of heavy bloom. The algae can be an irritant to skin and water spray containing lots of algae can be breathed in and irritate the lungs. Sometimes there is a toxin produced by the algae that can be more harmful to persons and animals. Dogs are susceptible to severe illness or death if they drink water infested with algae containing toxins. Unfortunately, there is no way to easily determine whether there is toxin present by looking. Seldom does the toxin cause problems, but it is important to be aware of the situation. The toxin can come and go before water test results are complete. If skin or breathing is irritated after water recreation, see a physician to determine the cause. If conditions look scummy or the water appears like paint, swimming and water recreation should be avoided. It’s always a good idea to shower after water recreation. In heavy infestations of scum, don’t allow water contact or allow your pets to drink the water. Keep small children and anyone with immune-deficiency issues or allergies out of the water and away from the spray while boating.

Unfortunately, there is nothing that can be done to remove the algae. Open areas of the lake are less likely to have serious issues as boat traffic and wind keep the algae mixed throughout the water profile. Rainfall, water movement, and cooler temperatures are the best solution to reducing the effects of the bloom, but are obviously not something under the control of the LPA.

Annual Fireworks

Even though Panorama Days have been cancelled this year, there will still be a fireworks show. The fireworks sponsored by the LPA will be launched from the South Shore around 9:30 p.m. on Friday Aug. 7.

Beach Ball 2020

A limited number of tickets remain for the Friends of Lake Panorama Beach Ball on Saturday, August 1. Proceeds will go towards the Friends’ current priority project to raise $70,000 for new playground equipment at Shady and Boulder beaches.

To ease concerns about COVID-19, both outdoor and indoor spaces will be used at the Lake Panorama National conference center. Outside tables will be under tents, located on the grass between the conference center and golf course. Live music and a live auction will take place outdoors.

Registration will be open 4-6 p.m. in the conference center dining room. A boxed evening meal will be available 5:30-7 p.m. Tickets are $40 each, with half going directly to the playground fund. A “sweet treat” dessert bar, offering donated dessert items plus a scoop of vanilla ice cream, will be open 6-7:30 p.m. Tickets for the dessert bar will be $3. Both silent and live auctions will be held to raise money for the playgrounds, plus a 50/50 raffle. Those who have auction items to donate or want to purchase tickets can call Susan Thompson at 515-240-6536 or email staff@friendsoflakepanorama.org.

The Links restaurant reopens

The Links restaurant at Lake Panorama National Resort reopened  July 25 at 11 a.m. Normal business hours resumed Sunday, July 26 at 8 a.m. Current hours of operation are.

Wednesday, Thursday & Friday -  11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday - 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sunday - 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ON THE LAKE
Buy, sell or trade and post your calendar events for free

Shane 09 16
By Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Posted 7/8/2020

Summer is upon us, and, as typical, it is moving along all too quickly. We are living in a world today with none of us truly sure how to respond. Meanwhile, we all need to keep moving forward. With that in mind, here are a few updates with your Lake Panorama newspaper.

It’s classified
Remember perusing the classified ads in a local newspaper? Free online services have changed how people buy, sell and trade today, leaving the traditional classified sections in the dust. But as consumers become more knowledgeable about how their data is being mined and sold from items they list for sale on sites like Facebook marketplace and Craigslist, they are doing so more cautiously. With that in mind, we are offering a free service for Lake Panorama residents — both in print and online — to help you sell your stuff. From homes to cars to boats to that old 8-track player, we can help. List anything and everything (that is legal) on our Lake Panorama marketplace site for FREE! See details at www.lakepanoramatimes.com under the classifieds pulldown. We will publish those classified ads in this publication for free as well.

Something bigger
Speaking of classifieds, you will notice regional ad listings in this issue of Lake Panorama Times. Those ads are part of a network that this publication now belongs to called Midwest Free Community Papers. It is an association of mostly independent publishers like us who group together to share ideas and to benefit from training. Each member agrees to run these ads and can also sell them. So if you have a need to affordably reach more than 2 million consumers in more than 120 publications in the Midwest, let me know and I will gladly show you how.

Ask Lake Panorama Times
If you’ve got questions, we’ll find the answers. That’s what I promised you in this column last month when I announced that we would be adding this feature.  We have three great questions this month. Be sure to check them out and send me any other questions you may have.

A calendar of events
One of the main reasons people read local publications is to seek out things to do. We are pleased to oblige. In this month’s issue, you will notice this new feature, as we work to eventually compile a comprehensive listing of events in the area. Yes, COVID-19 has forced the closure of many events, but many of you are still seeking things to do safely in the community and even from your home. If you have a personal, business, club or community event that you would like to have included, submit it online at www.lakepanoramatimes.com, and we will be sure to add it.

Digital edition emails keep rolling in
Want to view, share or save Lake Panorama Times editions on your phone, tablet or computer? Have friends or family members who would like to receive Lake Panorama Times? Sign them up. The service is free, and anyone can sign up or unsubscribe at any time. And you can do so knowing that we won’t collect and sell your data to anyone for any reason. Find details at www.lakepanoramatimes.com.
I continue to look forward to seeing many of you on the lake. As always, thanks for reading. 

SETTING SAIL ON LAKE PANORAMA
The Tometichs say they enjoy sailing on Lake Panorama, but it can be challenging.

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

It’s not every day you see a sailboat on Lake Panorama. In fact, it usually only happens a couple of times a month, mostly for Sunday night sunsets, or other times when the weather cooperates and the crowds are gone. That’s when Jim and Dee Tometich decide it’s time to sail.

The couple has lived at Lake Panorama since 2006. From their home in Helen’s Cove, they enjoyed seeing a sailboat docked at a home across the cove. About five years ago, Dee decided she wanted to buy the sailboat as a surprise birthday present for Jim. She did a little detective work to learn the owners’ name and get a phone number.

Dick and Lynda Pawlowski were the owners. They purchased their house in Helen’s Cove in 1994, although they owned a Lake Panorama lot for more than 40 years.

“I called Dick and told him if they ever decided to sell it, to please let me know,” says Dee.

At the time, the Pawlowskis had owned the boat more than three years.

“I’ve done a lot of things in my life, but I always wanted to learn to sail. I saw an ad for a Catalina 22 sailboat, which is a popular model for people just learning to sail,” Dick says.

“A gentleman who lived in Johnston used the boat on Saylorville Lake. He had never sailed before buying this boat but had learned and now was ready to sell it,” Dick says. “He had lots of books and videotapes on sailing and gave all those to me.”

Pawlowski used the material he received, plus help from a friend who came from Nebraska a couple of times, to learn to sail on Lake Panorama. He says he enjoyed it, but Lynda preferred their pontoon. So when Dee called, Dick decided it was time to let someone else live their dream of learning to sail.

“Working with Dick, it took us many attempts to get the lift and sailboat over to our dock before Jim would get home from work. But we finally pulled off the surprise,” Dee says.

The boat is a 1978 Catalina 22, which means it is 22 feet long. The mast is 25 feet tall. It has two sails, a main sail and a jib. Because Lake Panorama is so narrow, the Tometichs typically only use one. It has a large lead keel, about 5 feet below the bottom of the boat, which provides stability. Below deck, the cabin has a table for dining, and could sleep two people. The boat capacity is six people. The boat has a 9.9 hp Mercury four stroke motor.

“We love to use the sail as much as possible,” Jim says. “But due to the lake’s position and narrowness, it sometimes is necessary to use the motor.”

“We appreciated Dick giving us a couple of Sailing 101 lessons and helping us get started,” Dee says. “Now we also sail at Lake Dillion in Colorado, where we rent a boat when we visit.”

The Tometichs say they enjoy taking their sailboat out on Lake Panorama, but it can be challenging. Pawlowski agrees.

“But it also makes you a better sailor,” he says. “It’s easier to sail on larger lakes, because you don’t have to worry about it being so narrow,” Pawlowski says.

Despite the narrowness of Lake Panorama, sailboats are not banned. Sailboards are banned, which is something akin to windsurfing.

“This isn’t the most practical lake on which to sail,” says John Rutledge, LPA general manager. “LPA does not prohibit sailboats but discourages widespread use on Lake Panorama. The thought of dozens of sailboats on our narrow lake would be a concern if it became a popular trend.”

The Tometichs have learned what works for them — wait for most boaters to call it a day, then set sail from Helen’s Cove to enjoy the beauty of Lake Panorama.

BOATING SAFETY REMINDERS
Eighty-four percent of drowning victims who died from a boating accident were not wearing their life jackets.

Posted 7/8/2020
Provided by Lake Panorama Association

Boating While Intoxicated
Summertime on the lake is a great time to kick back with friends and family. For some, this involves enjoying an afternoon or evening on the water with a few adult beverages. Lake Panorama Association reminds all members to practice responsible boating when alcohol is involved.

Iowa DNR’s authority to enforce Boating While Intoxicated laws was brought into question regarding a July 7, 2018, citation against a Lake Panorama member. The Iowa Supreme Court upheld DNR’s authority to issue Boating While Intoxicated citations on Lake Panorama.

DNR already has issued multiple Boating While Intoxicated citations during the 2020 season and will continue to patrol the lake at their discretion. As a reminder, DNR operations are independent of LPA and operate under the authority of the State of Iowa.

Boaters should establish a designated driver plan for their time on the water. This has become common sense when travelling on highways, and the same safety precautions should be adopted on the water.

Boating Violations
A good share of the boating citations and warnings that are issued by both LPA Security and DNR officers are for guests who are operating vessels owned by LPA members. As a reminder, LPA violations apply to the LPA member’s account. If three fines occur in a given year, the member loses boating privileges for the season.

Perhaps more important is that LPA members may be found legally and financially liable for any injuries or damages that occur when guests are operating their equipment. It is the member’s responsibility to make sure guests know the rules and are competent and safe operators.

Personal Water Craft Reminders
When it comes to young people operating Personal Water Craft (PWC), Lake Panorama rules are more restrictive than state law. Youth under 18 may only operate a PWC at Lake Panorama under the following conditions: Operators must be at least 16 years old. Operators 16 or 17 years of age must pass the Iowa Boater Safety Education Course and have the boater education certificate with them while operating the vessel. It doesn’t matter whether an adult is riding with the teen or not.

Anyone riding or being towed by a PWC must be wearing an appropriate personal floatation device. Anyone being towed counts towards the rated capacity of the PWC, whether they are riding on the PWC or not. PWC operation is forbidden before sunrise and after sunset.

Life Jackets Required
State law requires life jackets on every watercraft, whether it’s a motorized boat, jet ski, kayak, canoe or even a paddleboard. Under Iowa law, any child younger than 13 must wear a life jacket while the boat is underway, including canoes, kayaks and paddleboards. On boats, a Type 4 throwable device is required in addition to the number of life vests required for each passenger. The throwable device does not count as a life vest.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 84 percent of drowning victims who died from a boating accident were not wearing their life jackets. It is best to wear a life jacket at all times, no matter your level of swimming or boating expertise.

Additional boating reminders
These are the most common issues LPA water patrol and DNR law enforcement come across:

Unattended vessels
There has to always be someone in the vessel, even while anchored, or tied to other boats. This includes jet skis.

Capacity sticker
This is required on the back-starboard side of the vessel (including jet skis), showing how many people the boat is able to hold. The sticker must be above the water line so it is visible, and must be at least 3 inches high and of contrast color to the boat.

Fire extinguishers
Check fire extinguishers often and know the location in your boat. Life expectancy of a fire extinguisher in a boat is shorter, because of the constant temperature changes and the hard impacts of running the boat through waves.

Speed
No vessel traveling at a speed in excess of 10 mph shall operate directly behind another vessel at a distance closer than 200 feet.

THIRD WETLAND NOW PROTECTS BURCHFIELD COVE
Past dredging and now the upstream Smith Wetland have made it possible for property owners to enjoy waterfront amenities.

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

Dredging at Lake Panorama has been going on for decades and is expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Yet, in recent years, attention also has turned to ways to reduce the flow of both sediment and nutrients into the lake.

One solution for Lake Panorama has been the establishment of upstream wetlands to protect specific areas of the lake. This spring was the first test for the third wetland built at Lake Panorama, which is positioned to help protect Burchfield Cove.

In the late 1990s, Iowa State University researchers began studying the use of small wetlands in drainage areas to slow water runoff from farm fields. They found these strategically placed wetlands could reduce the amount of nitrates moving into streams and rivers by 40 to 70 percent. By 2000, state officials were promoting a new incentive program to encourage landowners to install wetlands.

The Iowa Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) is a joint effort of the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. State and federal technical assistance and cost-share funds are available for landowners who voluntarily establish wetlands for water quality improvement in 37 north-central Iowa counties, including Guthrie County

During a strategic planning session in 2012, the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ) trustees decided to see if there were locations where CREP wetlands could be installed to help protect the lake.

In October 2016, the 26-acre Helen’s Cove/Donahey CREP wetland was completed. It includes a six-acre water pool, which hosts microbes that turn nitrogen into gas. The nitrogen removed by the wetland is equivalent to taking about 400 acres of row crops out of production. A special forebay collects sediment, which is cleaned periodically. This isn’t something done in all CREP wetlands, but because of the desire to keep as much sediment as possible from reaching Lake Panorama, special approval was granted to include this feature.

Construction on a similar wetland to protect Hughes Cove began in 2016, with final touches in the spring of 2017. The 23-acre Hughes Cove/Elmquist CREP wetland includes a control structure above a plunge pool, which routes the water back into a creek leading into Hughes Cove.

In 2018, planning began for a third wetland to be built in 2019 on RIZ-owned ground north of the Burchfield Cove bridge. This one, named the Smith wetland, has a higher percentage of deeper water for the wetland basin than the first two.

This 35-acre project consists of a nine-acre pool of water surrounded by cool season grasses and native grasses. It is a deep-water wetland, with a control structure above a plunge pool, which then routes water back into a creek leading into Lake Panorama at Burchfield Cove. The land surrounding the water pool has been seeded with a mix of 13 species of native grasses and 18 species of native wildflowers.

This project was possible because of a grant partnering the Soil & Water Conservation Society, Agribusiness Association of Iowa, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Iowa State University, Lake Panorama RIZ and Lake Panorama Association.

This grant funds projects that integrate in-field management practices with edge-of-field nitrate removal wetlands to provide a combined watershed approach — reducing in-field nutrient losses while providing edge-of-field treatment at small watershed scales.

The grant also targets restored wetlands in locations that receive significant shallow subsurface drainage, which is the primary transport mechanism of nitrates to surface water. This grant project was specifically designed for nitrate removal while also improving habitat for wildlife. The idea is to explore the development of wetlands that fall slightly outside of CREP guidelines.

RIZ has acquired property for a fourth wetland, which is upstream of the Smith Wetland. Preliminary conversations with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship has indicated a willingness to partner with RIZ on this fourth wetland.

Also in the planning stages is a streambank stabilization effort along the stream leading into Burchfield Cove. This type of project, in combination with wetlands, play important roles in the ongoing effort to protect Lake Panorama’s water quality.

UPGRADES TO LPA WATER PLANT MOVING FORWARD
LPA water bills will increase by $70 per quarter, going from $90 to $160 beginning in October.

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

Steady progress is being made on major upgrades to the LPA water plant. The project includes three main components — drilling an additional Jordan Well, upgrading to a reverse osmosis treatment strategy, and installing a discharge line to accompany the reverse osmosis process.

 A line to carry discharge water away from the new reverse osmosis (RO) system to the Middle Raccoon River by Highway 44 was installed in early summer, with only some soil restoration remaining.

An addition was constructed on the north side of the current building to house the RO system, which arrived by truck a few weeks ago. Work is underway to install the system, which will improve LPA’s finished water quality.

Mike Gliem, LPA’s water and dam supervisor, says the water will run through the RO tubes twice, using eight the first time and four the second time.

“Then we’ll combine this water with 20 percent raw water for the finished water provided to our customers,” Gliem says.

The Jordan Well has been drilled, and a pumping test completed, with excellent results. It will be another month before a pump is installed in that well, and water line connections completed. The well joins another one-half-mile deep Jordan well that was drilled in 2011.

The current system uses the first Jordan well and two Dakota wells constructed in the 1990s. The Dakota wells, which are in a shallower aquifer, had become less reliable. These wells have been the source of iron and manganese, that resulted in some customers having black and brown water flowing from their taps at times. Eliminating dependence on these temperamental wells was a key reason for this latest project.

Gliem expects to be able to stop using the Dakota wells sometime this fall. If all goes as planned, those two wells will be plugged, capped and covered with fill dirt next spring.

In 2017, a three-month reverse osmosis pilot study was conducted at the water plant. The results showed good finished water quality would be possible using only Jordan water treated by reverse osmosis.

Water hardness can be described as either parts per million or grains per gallon. Gliem says current LPA water has a hardness of 615 parts per million or 36 grains per gallon. The goal is to produce water that is 120 parts per million or 7 grains per gallon. “That goal is typical of what the Des Moines Water Works and other municipalities offer their water customers,” he says. “The pilot plant study showed we will be able to reach that goal.”

Once the RO system is complete and providing water to LPA members, Gliem says those who have water softeners in their homes will want to adjust their settings, and that the lifespan of softeners and other fixtures will be much longer. Those who have inline water filters probably will want to keep those, he says, but filters won’t need to be changed as often.

Large blue water mixing tanks in the water plant will be removed once the new system is online along with other old pieces of equipment and pipe. That area then will be the home for some components of the new system. Gliem expects the new plant to be online by late this year, or early in 2021.

Total cost for the entire project is $4.7 million. Funding for the project is through the State Revolving Loan Fund for drinking water improvements, at a fixed rate of 2-percent interest for 20 years.

To pay off the loan, LPA water bills will increase by $70 per quarter, going from $90 to $160 per quarter. This will begin with the October 1, 2020, bill. A reminder on this will go out in July, with the July 2020 bill being the final invoice at the old rate.

John Rutledge, LPA general manager, says even with this increase, LPA water bills are very comparable with other municipalities.

Options for a future infrastructure assessment have been discussed by the LPA board with no proposal finalized yet.

“The board will revisit this in late 2020 and determine if this is something they want to pursue in 2021 or a future year,” Rutledge said. “But for now, members need to know the cost of this plant is very affordable and will position LPA for decades to come.”

BEACH BALL 2020 - LET’S PLAY OUTSIDE!
So far $20,000 has been raised toward the $70,000 goal for the playgrounds.

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

The Friends of Lake Panorama board of directors voted at a meeting June 22 to proceed with Beach Ball 2020 on Saturday, Aug. 1, using the theme “Let’s Play Outside!”

To ease concerns about COVID-19, both outdoor and indoor spaces will be used at the Lake Panorama National conference center. Several aspects of the event have been modified to help with social distancing.

Funds raised at the 2020 Beach Ball will go toward the Friends’ current priority project to raise $70,000 for new playground equipment at Shady and Boulder beaches.

Direct contacts are being made with table sponsors so they can choose a reserved table inside or outside. Outside tables will be under a series of tents, located on the grass between the conference center and the golf course. A drink bar and a dessert bar will be on a roped-off section of the parking lot. The live auction also will take place outdoors.

Adding this outdoor venue made it possible to include live music for this year’s Beach Ball. Little Joe McCarthy is a Midwest singer and songwriter who grew up in Omaha. At first, McCarthy played as a solo acoustic performer, before spending many years in different bands. More recently, he has come full circle, playing acoustic guitar and singing as a solo performer around the Midwest. McCarthy will perform from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Registration will be open from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and take place in the conference center dining room. Attendees can park in both the west and east parking lot, and enter the dining room from either side. There will be two lines for registration. It is hoped that beginning registration an hour early will make social distancing easier.

At registration, each couple or individual will be assigned a number, and all charges through the evening can go against that number. These can include drink tickets, dessert tickets, and purchases of both silent and live auction items. The exception will be the 50/50 raffle, which will require cash only so the appropriate amount of cash will be available when the winning ticket is drawn.

The evening meal will be served 5:30-7 p.m. Tickets are $40 each, with half going directly to the playground fund. A “sweet treat” dessert bar, offering a variety of donated dessert items plus a scoop of vanilla ice cream, will be open 6-7:30 p.m. Tickets for the dessert bar will be $3.

Drink tickets will cost $6, and can be redeemed at either the outside bar or the bar in the banquet room. These tickets will cover domestic canned beer, well drinks and glasses of wine. A portion of each ticket sold will go to Friends.

Announcements will be made toward the end of the evening when people can start checkout. Payment by check or cash will be encouraged. There will be a laptop where credit cards can be used to pay online on the Friends website, with the processing fee of 2.9 percent added on.

So far, about 75 items have been donated for both silent and live auctions, but additional items are being sought. Of particular interest in the live auction will be a 14-feet shuffleboard table with accessories, donated and delivered by Kurt Johnson, valued at $3,500; signed footballs from Iowa and Iowa State; 14K white and yellow gold pendant necklace with a garnet and diamond, donated by Ames Silversmithing, valued at $975; handcrafted cedar kayak, donated by Chris Welp and valued at $2,500; and a case of Busch Light, signed by Carson King, the ISU student who raised $3 million for the University of Iowa Children’s Hospital, donated by Carrie Hansen and valued at $500.

Beach Ball organizers are considering offering live auction items first as an online auction, beginning July 20. The starting bid at the live auction Aug. 1 would then be the last bid placed online. Online bidders would be encouraged to attend the Beach Ball if they want to continue their pursuit of a particular item. Watch for additional details in the LPA and LPN newsletters, plus the Friends of Lake Panorama Facebook page and website.

Silent auction items will include a variety of gift baskets; two $100 Target gift cards; five $50 Casey’s gift cards; two handmade quilts; an LPN Stay-and-Play package valued at $680; both Iowa and Iowa State engraved cast iron skillets; a Utah Jazz NBA jersey signed by Georges Niang; and a Cake-of-the-Month item that will provide one home-baked cake creation every month for a year, prepared and donated by Tammy Deal.

Those who have items to donate to the auctions, or want to purchase tickets to the event, can call Susan Thompson at 515-240-6536 or email staff@friendsoflakepanorama.org.

Anyone who already paid for a table sponsorship or tickets, and now can’t or doesn’t want to attend because of the date change or concerns about COVID-19, can receive a refund on request. Or leave the money with Friends as a donation for the playgrounds.

So far $20,000 has been raised toward the $70,000 goal for the playgrounds. Donations for the playground project are accepted at any time, and can be mailed to P.O. Box 488, Panora, IA 50216. Checks should be made payable to Friends of Lake Panorama.

All donations are tax-deductible. Donors of $500 or more will be recognized on signs erected near both playgrounds, and on the donor page of the Friends website. More information about the playgrounds and other donation options is available at www.friendsoflakepanorama.org.

Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors Meeting

Posted 7/8/2020
May 26, 2020
Lake Panorama Association Office - Via Web Conference

The Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors met May 26, 2020, at 5 p.m., via Web Conference. Board members in attendance were Mary Jane Carothers, Emily Donovan, Gary Evans, Tom Jeschke, Rich Schumacher, Jim Spradling and Neil Wright.
LPA Staff in attendance: Danna Krambeer and John Rutledge.
Visitors in attendance: Dave Finneseth, LPA Member
President Carothers called the meeting to order at 5 p.m.

Agenda Item 1 – Approval of the Agenda –
Schumacher moved to approve the agenda. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 2 – Open Forum – No one present for open forum

Agenda Item 3 – Consent Agenda
Donovan moved to approve the consent agenda. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Consent agenda to include:
a) LPA General Manager’s Report
b) Approval of minutes from 04.28.2020 LPA Board Meeting
c) Acceptance of 04.30.2020 consolidated financial report – LPA & LPN, LLC
d) Accept 2019 Audit Report from Meriwether Wilson
e) Approve date of the next LPA board of directors meeting
f) Approval of minutes from 2019 LPA annual meeting
g) Approval of 2020 annual meeting agenda
h) Approve ballot counters for 2020 annual meeting
i) Accept minutes from 04.27.2020 LPN, LLC Board of Manager meeting
j) Accept 05.11.2020 Building Code Committee Minutes

Agenda Item 4a – Variance Request: B&T Snyder, LLC, Lot 1229, roof pitch as recommended by Building Codes committee   
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Tristen Snyder, Lot 1229, (5218 Panorama Terrace) presented house plans requiring a 4/12 roof pitch on four small planes of the roof. The committee decided the house was aesthetically pleasing and noted that other houses this year have been granted 4/12 roof pitches. Evans made a motion to approve a variance allowing a 4/12 roof pitch for lot 1229. Motion seconded by Dirk Westercamp and carried unanimously.
Evans moved to approve granting a variance for 4/12 roof pitch, per the plan presented, for B&T Snyder, LLC for lot 1229. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4b – Variance Request: Jeff and Tracy Drury, Lots 554, 555 & 556, setback of lighthouse from shoreline as recommended by Building Codes committee   
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Jeff Drury, Lots 554, 555 and 556, (4733 Panorama Drive) presented plans for a light house to be put between his house and the lake shoreline. He was asking for a variance of 25 feet closer to the water. Based on the light house’s ornamental nature, the nature of the surrounding shoreline, the neighbor’s approval and one neighbor preference to have the light house closer to shore and further from his own home. The committee weighed both approval of the structure, as well as the structure’s location. Motion Van Wyk to approve the lighthouse and the 25-foot setback variance, with clarification LPA would retain authority over any concerns regarding hours of operation and lumens of light discharged. Motion seconded by Esser and carried unanimously.
Evans moved to grant approval of the lighthouse and awarding a 25-foot lake setback variance, with clarification LPA would retain authority over any concerns regarding hours of operation and lumens of light discharged, for Jeff and Tracy Drury, for lot 554, 555 & 556 all combined.  Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4c – Variance Request: Darrell & Leisa Jobe, Lots 334 & 335 combined, front lot line setback and 3/12 and 4/12 roof pitch as recommended by Building Codes committee   
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Rick Hayes presented building plans for Darrell and Leisa Jobe’s new home, Lot 334 and 335, (6522 Coven Court). The plans would require a 10-foot setback from the front lot line along with two - 4/12 roof pitches and a 3/12 roof pitch over the front entryway. Based on neighbor’s approval and pleasing aesthetics, motion by Esser to approve a 10-foot front lot setback variance and roof pitch variances of 3/12 and 4/12 for lots 334 and 335, as presented in the building plans. Motion seconded by Knudsen and carried unanimously.
Evans moved to approve granting a variance for a 10-foot front lot setback variance and a variance for roof pitches of 3/12 and 4/12 for Darrell & Leisa Jobe, Lot 334 & 335 combined, per the plans submitted. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 5a – Old Business - None

Agenda Item 6a – Other Business – None

Agenda Item 7 – Closed Session – The board entered closed session at 5:25 p.m. to discuss legal matters. The board exited closed session at 6 p.m.

Schumacher moved to approve a confidential legal agreement, as discussed in closed session, contingent upon final document review by LPA attorney and execution by LPA general manager. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Adjourn - With no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 6 p.m.

Ask Lake Panorama Times
If you’ve got questions, we’ll find the answers.

Posted 7/8/2020

Q: Now that Gov. Reynolds has lifted the restriction on public pools, when will our pool reopen? — Gerri

A.
The swimming pool adjacent to the Lake Panorama National conference center opened July 1 and is available for public swimming daily 10:30 a.m. to dusk. Annual memberships can be purchased by both LPA members and non-members. Swimmers must check in at the pro shop counter where they will sign in and pay the daily fee of $3, if they have not purchased a membership. Everyone will be given a wristband to wear in the pool area. In order to encourage physical distancing, tables and chairs have been placed 6 feet apart.

Q: Are sailboats allowed on Lake Panorama? — Bill

A:
Funny you should ask. A story in this month’s issue features a lake couple who purchased a sailboat and are using it on the lake. The story states that although Lake Panorama is not ideal for sailing due to it being narrow, it is allowed (but not encouraged, as an abundance of sailboats could cause problems).

Q: How often should a septic tank be pumped?  — Lisa

A:
The answer to this question can vary depending on usage and how many people live in your household. But, generally speaking, those in the industry say the average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional and pumped every three to five years.

Submit your questions at https://www.lakepanoramatimes.com/contact-us

Gubser joines GCSB Investment Center as Client Services Coordinator

Gubser.v 451.f
Posted 7/8/2020

GCSB Investment Center welcomes a familiar face, Vicki Gubser, as the Client Services Coordinator. Guthrie County State Bank customers may be familiar with Vicki from her past five years serving as Heritage Club Director. In her new role, she will assist with client service tasks, as well as provide administrative support.
Gubser’s background in banking, real estate and insurance brings a wealth of financial knowledge to GCSB Investment Center customers. She looks forward to working with customers as they plan for their financial futures.

“Due to our growth, we are very excited to add a full-time team member. Gubser’s background in various areas of the financial industry made her a natural fit for the position,” said Kristen Crouthamel, AIF®, Financial Advisor with GCSB Investment Center.

Originally from the Bagley area, Gubser currently resides at Lake Panorama. Outside of work, she serves as the treasurer of the United Methodist Church in Panora, vice president of P. E. O. Chapter BY, and also as the secretary of the Guthrie County Airport Authority board.

The GCSB Investment Center team splits time between the offices located inside Guthrie County State Bank in both Guthrie Center and Panora. Gubser’s time will mostly be spent in the Guthrie Center location. Appointments with Financial Advisor Kristen Crouthamel, AIF® are recommended. The location of appointments is flexible based on client need.

GCSB Investment Center provides investment and retirement savings to clients interested in improving their financial future. They offer a wide variety of solutions including individual, retirement, financial planning, employer group plans and benefits and corporate investment accounts. Initial consultations and portfolio risk analysis are provided at no cost. Visit www.investgcsb.com for more information or to contact the GCSB Investment Center team.

Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Adviser. Guthrie County State Bank and GCSB Investment Center are not affiliated with Cambridge. Non-deposit investment products are not FDIC insured, not bank guaranteed and may lose value.

51st LPA ANNUAL MEETING held June 27
LPN operation showed an operating loss of $245,481, although overall revenue was up $111,06 from 2018.

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

The 51st annual meeting of the Lake Panorama Association was June 27, seven weeks later than originally planned. Concerns about COVID-19 and the need for social distancing led to the postponement.

John Rutledge, LPA general manager, said normally members are encouraged to attend the annual meeting. But this year, he was happy to see a smaller crowd spread throughout the Lake Panorama National banquet room. As usual, the meeting provided an update on activities during the past year, plus a look ahead to the next 12 months.

Re-elected to the LPA board for another three-year term was Mary Jane Carothers. Newly elected was David Finneseth, replacing Tom Jeschke. Jeschke has been on the LPA board for 12 of the past 14 years, and served as president four years. He was thanked for his service by both Carothers and Rutledge during their reports.

Gary Evans, LPA board treasurer, provided the 2019 financial and audit report for the LPA and its subsidiary, LPN, LLC. For 2019, Evans said the LPN operation showed an operating loss of $245,481, although overall revenue was up $111,06 from 2018.

“Maintaining a profitable subsidiary that specializes in the golf and restaurant industry continues to be a challenge,” Evans said. “The LPN board of managers continues to work with LPN staff to ensure our subsidiary is pursuing improved strategies to maximize performance in future years.”

Turning to the LPA, Evans drew attention to the association’s income statement, which showed actual 2018 and 2019 revenues and expenses, plus the 2020 budget numbers for comparison.

Evans said the 2019 net income was $549,751, which included $235,959 that was the auditors’ adjustment for land sales expense.

“This is an accounting adjustment for tax purposes and does not represent new money coming into the organization,” he said.

Evans said the LPA board decided a 5-percent dues increase should be applied for 2020.

“The board’s budgeting process focuses extensively on cash flow,” he said. “Cash balances are targeted for 20 percent, with the possibility these will be in the 17 to 18 percent range if non-budgeted expenditures are approved as a midyear budget amendment.”

Evans said it’s important to remember the LPA board does not set its annual operating budget with the expectation of selling land. All operating expenses are covered by LPA’s recurring operating revenues.

Carothers, completing her first year as LPA board president, chaired the meeting. In her report to the membership, Carothers said 2020 has brought many challenges and changes to the LPA operations.

For instance, a major leak was identified in the water main running under Burchfield Cove, which required repair prior to the peak summer season. In mid-March, Gov. Reynolds ordered restaurants and bars to close, just as the LPN anticipated ramping up operations for the summer season.

Carothers said LPA and LPN management had to draft contingency plans for the loss of expected revenue for the two operations.

“LPA and LPN had to create and regularly update COVID pandemic operation plans that could reasonably assure the safety of members, customers, visitors and employees at the conference center, golf courses, campgrounds and sports courts,” she said. “Personnel policy updates were in a state of constant flux, which proved to be both time consuming and challenging.”

In addition, plans had to be developed to continue essential operations at LPA such as roads, dam operations and security coverage in the event COVID or a state stay-at-home order created critical staff shortages, Carothers said.

Despite these and other challenges, there also have been positives, she said.

“The new LPA water system is on target for completion late this year or early in 2021, and the water main leak under Burchfield Cove has been repaired,” Carothers said. “The conference center has successfully reopened for business. LPN golf courses continued to operate while many other businesses were forced to close. Now golf league play has resumed, and the sports courts and campgrounds also are back in use.”

In closing, Carothers expressed appreciation to LPA members for their patience and support during the last few months.

“You have been understanding and tolerant when operations had to change,” she said. “Our community is diverse in life experience, and our members hold a wide spectrum of perspectives on how LPA should approach such unprecedented times. Please continue to support your board members and management as we work together to ensure Lake Panorama remains an amazing place to enjoy and live.”

John Rutledge, LPA general manager and LPN, LLC director of operations, began his report with a look at the LPN.

“The LPN, LLC operation continues to be a great benefit to our community. But it also continues to be a challenging business model to perfect,” he said. “I’m proud to say our staff and board continue to work on ways we can improve the guest experience and also pursue the best financial outcome possible.”

Rutledge said the dissolution of the Clover Ridge Timeshares has had a definite impact on LPN operations.

“We have been able to use some of the units while they’re on the market for sale. But there is no doubt the short-term impact of the timeshare dissolution had a negative impact on LPN’s bottom line, with reduced traffic on the golf course and in the Links restaurant,” he said. “The long-term impact remains to be seen, as we work to adapt to this new environment.”

A facility review was completed by an architect from Shive-Hattery.

“Major overhaul of the conference center proved to be beyond our current financial capacity, so we will look at options to improve the building incrementally on a year-to-year basis,” Rutledge said.

Dan Wollner has announced he is in his 40th and final year as LPN golf course superintendent.

“A succession plan has been implemented, which will promote Brandon Waddle to the top spot,” Rutledge said. “Thanks to Dan for his stewardship of our beautiful golf course for four decades.”

Rutledge said COVID-19 has been challenging.

“In our busy season, the combined number of employees on the payroll of LPA and LPN reaches 150 people, many of whom are part time. Adjusting personnel policies has been challenging for both entities,” he said.

LPN did apply for the Payroll Protection Program through the U.S. Small Business Administration, which provided LPN, LLC with a loan of $229,000.

“Based on the most recent updates to this program, LPN will be eligible for 100 percent forgiveness of this loan,” Rutledge said. “This will help us keep 2020’s bottom line from being absolutely wrecked by COVID-19.”

Shifting gears to the LPA, Rutledge outlined two major capital projects that have been under discussion by the LPA board for several years.

One project currently underway involves upgrades to the LPA water plant. LPA secured a 2 percent, 20-year loan from the State Revolving Loan Fund for $4.75 million to cover the project.

“The new Jordan well has been drilled, and test pumping showed excellent results,” Rutledge said. “LPA now will rely on a pair of Jordan wells, which have ample quantities of water and are free of the iron and manganese issues we’ve fought on the Dakota wells.”

A line to carry discharge water away from the new reverse osmosis (RO) system to the Middle Raccoon River by Highway 44 is complete, with only some soil restoration remaining. The RO system has been delivered and construction is underway. Rutledge said transition from the current system to the new system will happen either in late 2020 or early 2021.

Rutledge said LPA’s water today is quite hard.

“When the new system is in place, about 80 percent of the hardness members experience will be eliminated. Those with in-house softeners probably will still use them, but only a fraction of the salt used today will be needed,” he said.

As mentioned at the May 2019 annual meeting, LPA water bills will increase by $70 per quarter, going from $90 to $160 per quarter. This will begin with the Oct. 1, 2020, bill. A reminder on this will go out in July, with the July 2020 bill being the final invoice at the old rate.

The other large project completed within the last year was the replacement of the LPA maintenance facility, which cost $1.78 million. Payoff of this has been structured as a 20-year loan and will require LPA to set-aside between 20 and 25 percent of the association’s annual capital budget amount for payback.

Rutledge said LPA has undertaken a number of long-term projects for which substantial investment was needed.

“In the case of the water plant and the LPA shop, financing was necessary. These projects represent an investment in our future, and replace core assets we depend on every day,” he said.

“Pursuing both the shop and the water plant at the same time was challenging, but prudent. Interest rates for financing were favorable, and the need to proceed with both the shop and water plant had grown to the point where they could not be deferred much longer. Thank you to the membership and the board for supporting these investments in Lake Panorama’s future.”

Rutledge talked about the January Iowa Supreme Court ruling that the waters of Lake Panorama are public. The ruling also noted the land surrounding Lake Panorama is privately controlled and clarified LPA and its membership has no obligation to allow access to the water.

“As we’ve always known, Lake Panorama is a de-facto private lake despite the fact it is one-in-the-same with the Middle Raccoon River. We expect no changes in how LPA operates, but certainly answered a lot of questions based upon social media posts and speculation that Lake Panorama was now open to all,” he said. “We’ve installed a camera at the LPA marina, are working on improved signage, and continue to rely on our close partnership with Coulters Marine for oversight of the boat ramp.”

That Supreme Court ruling caused some concern about wording in Iowa Code 357H, which governs Rural Improvement Zones.

“We worked with State Senator Jake Chapman and State Representative Bubba Sorensen, who represent our district, to secure an amendment to clarify the definition of ‘private lake development,’ which was rather vague,” Rutledge said.

“The concern we had was future bond counsel reviews and our ability to issue new debt. We didn’t want this public/private issue to spill over to the Lake Panorama RIZ. The new language states RIZ applies to a private real estate development adjacent to or abutting a lake,” Rutledge said. “We believe this remains consistent with the spirit of the original law but removes any cloud of doubt regarding RIZ as it relates to the public/private status of the water.”

Rutledge said Senator Tim Kraayenbrink, who owns property at Lake Panorama, and LPA member Brian Johnson, also were instrumental in securing this amendment.

Rutledge also talked about the broken water line under Burchfield Cove that was discovered in late 2019 and replaced in June. The cost of replacing the line plus implementing some necessary water main extensions topped $400,000.

“This was not budgeted, but LPA was able to postpone some other projects to soften the blow of this expense,” Rutledge said. “Plans for replacing the other lake crossings are under review for LPA’s five-year capital budget plan. The cost of these should be less because the water mains connected to those crossings will not require the work associated with the Burchfield project.”

Other items Rutledge highlighted in his remarks included:

The Guthrie County engineer has said Sage Trail will be restored this summer to a condition similar to 2012. This is not hard surface pavement, but is better than a basic gravel road that needs graded frequently. The engineer also is exploring a hot-mix asphalt to add on either side of the Burchfield Bridge.

RIZ hired Dredge America to remove three-quarters of a million yards of silt from the river channel. This was contracted to supplement LPA’s work and make use of silt basin easements that expire within the 2020 decade. Cost is estimated at $4.1 to $4.2 million.

The Smith Wetland north of Burchfield Cove is complete, and the third wetland is installed to help protect Lake Panorama’s water quality. Land for a fourth wetland has been acquired, and the project is in the works. This wetland lies upstream of the Smith wetland.

A new, larger debris skimmer has been ordered by RIZ and will be delivered in July. This is a $400,000 purchase and will replace the skimmer LPA purchased more than 20 years ago. The old unit will remain as a backup.

An excavator with both standard and long-reach capabilities also was purchased by RIZ in 2019, which will be used for silt-basin, wetland, and small cove maintenance, plus riprap of selected areas.

The Lake Panorama 50th anniversary book remains available for purchase through either the LPA or LPN, at a cost of $35.

Q&A:  John Rutledge, General Manager, Lake Panorama Association

Posted 7/8/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

This month’s Q&A gives John Rutledge, Lake Panorama Association general manager, the chance to catch us up on several topics.

Q: Earlier this year, there was a construction project at the west end of Jones Cove. Tell us about that work.

A:
The repair work at Jones Cove involved adding sheetpile, backfill and realignment of the concrete tubes underneath the dam. The concrete tubes were starting to pull apart and shift/slide down the slope toward the cove. This was likely due to freeze-thaw cycles and water movement through the tubes over the years. The soil material beneath the tubes was no longer structurally sound enough to support the tubes.

Adam Benner already was under contract with RIZ for a suite of other sediment basin repairs, for which he had been chosen as low bidder. This project was added to realign the tubes and improve the foundation that serves as the sediment basin dam and tube bedding.
This was done by driving sheetpile straight down at the edge of the cove. Limestone rock was added behind the sheetpile for backfill. Once the backfill was in place, Benner was able to grade the surface to a level condition and put the same concrete tubes back in place. Once the tubes were reconnected, a drainage tile was built into the dam bank to pull seepage out of the bank and direct it to the lake. The final step was regrading the surface of the silt dam and restoring it with grass seed.
With this work complete, RIZ now will be able to watch the tubes over the next few years and see if there is any continued movement. LPA staff and RIZ engineers will do this by measuring the seam gaps between the tubes. As with all basin projects, ongoing maintenance is key to ensuring these structures remain in good repair.

Q: An unusual loss of water from the LPA water system late last year alerted you to the fact there was a break in a water main under Burchfield Cove. What did the repair work entail, and what are the implications for other under-the-lake mains that exist?

A:
LPA experienced a broken water line under Burchfield Cove in late 2019. The timing of this break was fortunate, as it occurred during our slow part of the season. LaGrange Inc. out of Amana, Iowa, was contracted to bore a new water crossing about halfway up Burchfield Cove. The original crossing had been further south. The new crossing will help bring better water pressure to the homes on the east side of the cove. Installation of the new line was finalized in June and is successfully in-service.

The cost of replacing the line plus implementing some necessary water main extensions topped $400,000. This was not budgeted, but LPA was able to postpone some other projects to soften the blow of this expense. There are four other crossings under the lake that bring water to the east side of Lake Panorama from the water plant on the west side. Three of these are primary crossings and one is smaller. The southernmost primary crossing travels from Christmas Tree Point to Tie Road. The middle primary crossing travels north/northeast from Sunset Beach. Finally, there is a smaller crossing at the upper reaches of the Burchfield Cove creek channel. Plans for replacing the other lake crossings are under review for LPA’s five-year capital budget plan. The cost of these should be less because the water mains connected to those crossings will not require the same amount of work as the Burchfield project.

Q: Yet another water-related project is some work planned below the lake dam yet this year. Tell us about that.

A:
The LPA dam continues to be inspected regularly, with ongoing maintenance, and repair items being a top priority for the association. One minor maintenance project is planned for this year. The low-flow outlet at the dam has caused some erosion downstream where the water is let out. LPA has hired a contractor Double L Construction and Brock Robson to go down the backside of the dam to dig out and replace the old riprap. Fabric material will be placed over the newly graded area, then covered with 12-inch limestone. This new area should allow water to run directly into the Middle Raccoon River without eroding the bank.
Some long-term improvement to the berm between the primary spillway and the emergency spillway remains under review this year, and will be either a 2021 or 2022 project.

Q: A new person on the LPA staff is taking over management of issues related to the association’s building codes. Give us details.

A:
Lane Rumelhart, who joined our staff Dec. 30 as LPA project manager, now is responsible for managing the LPA building codes, interacting with the building codes committee and LPA members. Working six summers for Rumelhart Building Co. in Guthrie Center, which is owned by his grandfather, provided him with experience in reading blueprints and all aspects of construction, so he’s a good fit for these tasks.

Building codes are an important component of what the LPA staff manages annually. For instance, in 2019, 69 land disturbing permits were issued. Seventy-five building permits were issued, including 13 new homes, 15 decks, 17 additions, one boathouse rehab, one permanent dock, two fences, 20 storage sheds, two gazebos, two detached garages and two demolitions. As you can see, there are a lot of different types of projects that fall under the LPA building codes.

Lane is taking the responsibility from Mike Gliem, who has been doing “double-duty” for LPA for several years. Mike’s done a great job, but this transition makes a lot of sense considering Mike will be managing the transition from our old water plant to our new reverse osmosis system.
Besides building codes, Lane’s other duties include management of some projects financed by the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ), assisting with LPA communications, the annual deer hunt program, and campground and beach management.

Calendar of Events July 9-Aug. 10, 2020

Posted 7/8/2020

Softball Girls Varsity Game
Thursday, July 9, 5:30 p.m.

vs. Boyer Valley, Panorama High School

Softball Girls JV Game
Thursday, July 9, 7:30 p.m.

vs. Boyer Valley, Panorama High School

Softball Girls Varsity Game
Friday, July 10, 5:30 p.m.

vs. Coon Rapids Bayard, Panorama High School

Softball Girls JV Game,
Friday, July 10, 7:30 p.m.

vs. Coon Rapids Bayard, Panorama High School

Shop Local, Eat Local, Be Local Shopping event
Friday, July 10, all day

(recurring, second Friday of each month), www.panorachamber.org

Walt Brammer’s 95th birthday open house
Sunday, July 12, 2-4 p.m.

Panorama National Convention Center, 5071 Clover Ridge Road

Panora City Council town hall style meeting
July 13, 6:30 p.m.

Panora Veteran’s Auditorium. The town hall meeting will be for residents who would like to address the Council regarding the consideration of allowing ATVs and UTVs to be driven on City Streets in Panora. Currently, these types of vehicles are not allowed. The Council would like to hear from all citizens, for and against, to aid in the drafting of a potential ordinance. Written comments are recommended and will be read at the meeting. For those who would like to attend in person, registration will be required in advance. www.cityofpanora.com

Midwest Partnership Golf Outing 2020
Friday, July 17

Lake Panorama National Golf Resort 5071 Clover Ridge Road, Panora,
www.midwestpartnership.com/golf-outing.cfm

Panora Chamber of Commerce Meeting
Monday, July 20 at noon

Location not yet decided.
www.panorachamber.org

Panora City Council Meeting
Monday, July 27, 6:30 p.m

www.cityofpanora.com

Friends of Lake Panorama’s Beach Ball
Saturday, Aug. 1

Lake Panorama National conference center. Registration opens at 4 p.m., evening meal served from 5:30-7 p.m., entertainment from Little Joe McCarthy from 5-9 p.m.
www.friendsoflakepanorama.org

Panorama Community Schools School Board meeting
Monday, Aug. 10, 6:30 p.m.



Submit your free items for the Lake Panorama Times calendar of events at https://www.lakepanoramatimes.com/contact-us

Obituary

Ray pals final
Posted 7/8/2020

Ray Michael Pals, 72, of Panora, Iowa and Mission, Texas, died on June 30, 2020, in Mission.

He was born on May 11, 1948, in Belmond, Iowa, the son of Ray Edward and Marian (Green) Pals. He graduated from Belmond Community High School in 1966, and shortly after began a 32-year career as an installation technician with Western Electric, AT&T and Lucent Technologies.
Ray married Mary Pauk on March 1, 1975, in Corwith, and they settled in Van Meter, where they lived for many years. He was a longtime member of the Izaak Walton League, and enjoyed camping with his family until they purchased their summer home on Lake Panorama in Panora. Ray liked water skiing, leisurely boat rides, grill outs and card games. In later years, he became an avid woodworker, never straying far from the workshop where he created and donated many pieces to area charities.

He was a mainstay at cribbage tournaments around Panora, and rarely missed a weekend of sports: If Ray knew about the game, he’d be watching on TV. He liked going south to Texas for the winter, where he filled his days with live music, golf cart rides, happy hours with friends and crafting beautiful woodwork for his friends and family.

Ray was a friend to everyone he met. He had a sharp wit and a playful spirit, and was quick with a smile or joke that put anyone at ease. He cared deeply for his family, who miss him greatly.
He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Mary; daughter Tonia (Sam) Martin of Clive; son Wade (Stacy) Pals of Williamsburg, Kentucky, and three granddaughters, Emily, Makenna and Avery.

He was preceded in death by his parents.
A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 4 at St. Pius X Catholic Church in Urbandale, Iowa. Visitation will be from 9:30-11 a.m., with a memorial service to follow at 11 a.m. We will follow all current COVID-19 restrictions.

Memorial contributions may be made to the family or to Tori’s Angels, 4677 Panorama Drive, Panora, IA, 50216.

Submit free obituaries at
https://www.lakepanoramatimes.com/contact-us

Lake Dogs and Cove Cats

Posted 7/8/20
Lake Panorama residents love their pets!

Lake Dog
Name:
Memphis
Age: 2.5 years
Breed: English Labrador
Owners:  The Patterson Family: Colleen, Jerry, Jerry Jr. and Abbey (pictured with Memphis).

Memphis is a 100-pound sweetheart that thinks it is still a lap dog. It is a gentle giant that loves playing with other dogs and meeting new humans. For fun, it is part of a dog hike group and goes off leash to hike with other dogs. Memphis also loves swimming at the lake. This lake dog greets visitors with something in its mouth when they enter the house. Abbey says, “He’s the sweetest floof ever!”

Cove Cat
Name:
Dijon
Age: 3-4 year old tortoise shell/tabby
Available for adoption at Panora Pets
114 W. Main St., Panora
www.PanoraPets.com
Like its name, Dijon is a bit sassy with a big purrsonality. It is very friendly and independent and is good with children and other kitties.  Dijon would be a great addition to a family on the lake or off the lake.  She is absolutely beautiful and sweet!

Panora Pets is a non-profit rescue consisting of several volunteers like Tim Randall and George Jones, providing shelter and services for cats in need in the Panora area. Stop in and visit the beautiful kitties and hopefully take one home. Through contributions from the community and beyond, P.E.T.S maintains its dedication to animals in need. 

Golf Outing of the Midwest Partnership EDC

The 25th Annual Golf Outing of the Midwest Partnership EDC is July 17.  There is still time to register. The outing will be taking place at Lake Panorama National Resort & Conference Center near Panora.

The cost to register a team is $325, or individuals can play for $85, which covers golfing on 18 holes, cart fees and BBQ lunch.  Teams will also be recognized on event promotional material.

Additionally, there are sponsorship opportunities for teams and those unavailable to attend.  See complete list of sponsorship levels on the MWP website.

Register Online Here

 

ON THE LAKE
A very still swan, magazine relaunches,
LPT digital edition and a new feature

Shane 09 16
By Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Posted 6/10/2020

Take a look at our banner photo on the front page. Go ahead. I will wait for you.
Wonder where that swan came from, why it is in the pond on the ninth hole at Lake Panorama National golf course, and how it can remain so still? You can thank our Canadian feathered friends.

Lake Panorama has become the year-round home for many Canada geese. Adults mate for life and often return to the same location each year to build a nest with a preference for ground level near water. Ponds on the Lake Panorama National golf course have become favorite nesting spots. In an attempt to keep the Canada geese at bay, four fake swans have been installed in three LPN ponds.

Each is tethered by a rope tied to a brick and moved periodically around the pond. The theory is that geese are afraid of swans and will stay away. Two swans were placed in the pond on the fifth hole in 2019 and did their job for a while, but eventually the geese got used to them and took back the water. Meanwhile, this swan on the ninth hole seems to be enjoying the sunshine and water fountain. And why not?

Back in business
I shared with you in past columns that this may not have been the best time to buy a newspaper, but I am still glad I did. While we suspended the publishing of most of our other publications, we didn’t miss a beat with Lake Panorama Times. It just didn’t’ seem right to cease publishing something I just bought. Now it appears that our economy and our local businesses will be rebounding, and that is true for us, too. Those of you who have homes in the Des Moines suburbs are familiar with our monthly Living magazines, of which we published 19 separate zones. I am pleased to share that we are bringing 12 of those back in June and hope to bring back more in months ahead. We are also re-launching CITYVIEW magazine in July and will have it available at more than 700 locations again soon. When you support the businesses that advertise in this publication or any of our others, you support us, too. That’s what makes this newspaper viable, and we appreciate it when everyone buys from local businesses.

Sign up for our digital edition emails
Last month we launched our email service, which allows you to receive a link to the digital edition of Lake Panorama Times. Several dozen of you signed up for it already and can now view, share or save those editions on your phone, tablet or computer. Have friends or family members who would like to receive Lake Panorama Times? Sign them up. The service is free, and anyone can sign up or unsubscribe at any time. And you can do so knowing that we don’t collect and sell your data to anyone for any reason. Find details at www.lakepanoramatimes.com.

Ask Lake Panorama Times
Starting next month, we will be publishing a new feature here called “Ask Lake Panorama Times.” You send us your questions, and we will research and publish the answers. You might wonder if you have to license pets at the lake, or where to dispose of lawn debris, or why there are fake swans on the ponds at Lake Panorama National golf course. OK, we have one of those covered for you already, but send any other questions to me from the “Get In Touch” portion of our newly designed website at www.lakepanoramatimes.com.
I look forward to seeing you on the lake. And, as always, thanks for reading. 

DONORS AND VOLUNTEERS IMPROVE BEACH LANDSCAPES
Two trees that had been planted at Maureen Lubeck’s home were transplanted to Boulder Beach.

Posted 6/10/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

Some spur-of-the-moment plans led to new landscaping efforts at both Boulder and Shady beaches this spring. For starters, two trees that had been planted at Maureen Lubeck’s home were transplanted to Boulder Beach.

One tree, a Japanese lilac, was planted in her yard five years ago in memory of her mother-in-law, Doris Russell. The other, a red maple, was planted a year ago in memory of her husband Kim, who passed away unexpectedly in September 2018. Maureen recently purchased a Boulder Cove condo and is selling her waterfront home on the west side of Lake Panorama. The thought of leaving behind those two memorial trees made her move more difficult.

Lubeck contacted Martin Wood with Wood Landscaping of Panora to ask if the two trees could be transplanted. Once Wood confirmed it would be possible, she contacted the LPA about moving the trees to Boulder Beach and received approval.

At the time of Kim’s death, the Lubeck family designated Friends of Lake Panorama as one of the places memorial gifts could be given. At the family’s request, funds received were used to purchase and place an 8-foot metal bench at Boulder Beach. The bench is attached to a large concrete pad and positioned with a view of the lake and Boulder Beach.

The family chose a bright blue color for the bench. They also chose the wording for a memorial plaque on the bench: “In Memory of Kim Lubeck, A Life Well Lived.” It was a natural decision to have these two trees transplanted near the bench.

 Brothers Martin and Kevin Wood, and Martin’s son Casey, dug up the trees May 12 at the Lubeck home and transplanted them the following day at Boulder Beach.

At Shady Beach, six volunteers spent the morning of May 21 cleaning up the perennial flower beds planted on top of the stone wall near the beach, plus the surrounding grassy area and steps to the beach. Leaves, sticks and other debris were raked up, loaded into a truck, and hauled to the LPA waste recycling site.

Perennials in the beds that will show their stuff later in the year include coneflowers, day lilies, salvia and perennial grasses. But to provide color now that will last through much of the summer, the volunteers planted 300 petunias in a variety of colors.

The volunteer crew was organized by Sue Merryman and included Amy Johnson, JoAnn Johnson, Beth Muenzenberger, Sue Hendricks and Jim Vandevanter. These volunteers are taking over maintenance of the landscaped beds, which have previously been cared for by LPA members Mike and Nancy James. The James’ volunteer service over the years has made Shady Beach a colorful venue for family gatherings and events.

The remaining beach at Lake Panorama has a long tradition of landscaping assistance from many people who live in the Sunset Beach neighborhood. Jody and Merlin Muench lead the volunteer effort there. Merlin has removed the dead portion of perennial grasses near the beach, and run a weed-eater around trees. Galen and Pam Johnson cleaned up the landscape bed near the beach entrance. Other volunteers soon will help cleanup remaining winter debris, put down new mulch, and perform maintenance work throughout the year.

BEACH BALL FUNDRAISER ON TAP FOR AUG. 1
One new auction item recently donated is a 15-foot handcrafted cedar kayak.

Posted 6/10/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

The Friends of Lake Panorama board has set a deadline of July 1 to decide how its third Beach Ball, planned for Aug. 1, will be structured. The event was postponed from April 18 because of restrictions caused by COVID-19.

With the current 50-percent capacity regulation, it wouldn’t be possible for the LPN conference center to host the 250 guests who originally planned to attend this event. The Friends board is discussing adjustments that will make it possible for the event to be held Aug. 1, even if the capacity regulation doesn’t change.

When final plans are in place, current table sponsors and ticket buyers will be contacted directly. Details also will be publicized on the Friends website and Facebook pages, the LPA and LPN weekly newsletters, and the July issue of the Lake Panorama Times.

Anyone who already has paid for a table sponsorship or tickets and can’t attend can choose to either leave the money with Friends as a direct donation for the playground project or ask for a refund.

Those who can attend and have not yet paid for their table sponsorships and tickets will be asked to do so. Any remaining seats available will be offered to those on a waiting list. Anyone interested in attending who hasn’t yet gotten on the waiting list can do so by contacting Susan Thompson, 515-240-6536, or staff@friendsoflakepanorama.org.

The Friends board is pleased with the support shown for the 2020 Beach Ball, which will raise money for new playground equipment at Boulder and Shady beaches. So far, about 100 items have been donated for auctions and a raffle, and additional donated items are welcomed. There also will be other fundraising activities as part of the Beach Ball.

One new item recently donated that will turn heads during the live auction is a 15-foot handcrafted cedar kayak. LPN member Christopher Welp is donating the kayak, which he purchased about 10 years ago. It’s been on the water just a few times, and Welp will attest that it is fast. The kayak is about 25 inches wide and weighs 45 pounds. It will be sold with a stand, paddle and cloth bag.

The kayak was built at Old Modern Handicrafts in Santa Ana, California, which typically takes about 500 hours. Strips of cedar are joined together by hand and encapsulated in fiberglass bonded in place with epoxy resin, then coated with marine vanish. This combination of fiberglass and epoxy is strong and transparent so the beauty of the wood shines through. This kayak new costs $4,000. A value of $2,500 has been placed on it for the Beach Ball auction.

So far $17,500 has been raised toward the $70,000 goal for the playgrounds. Donations for the playground project are accepted at any time and can be mailed to P.O. Box 488, Panora, IA 50216. Checks should be made payable to Friends of Lake Panorama.

All donations are tax-deductible, and donors receive a thank you letter acknowledging their donation. Donors of $500 or more will be recognized on signs erected near both playgrounds and on the donor page of the Friends website.

More information about the playgrounds and other donation options is available at www.friendsoflakepanorama.org.

LAKE PANORAMA FIREWORKS
LPA members are responsible to avoid any activity that could be declared a nuisance to their neighbors.

Posted 6/10/20

The Fourth of July holiday brings two types of fireworks to Lake Panorama.

The annual “Fire in the Sky” fireworks display sanctioned by the Lake Panorama Association and put on by the Scheiring family will be at dusk on Saturday, July 4. The fireworks will be set off from the traditional spot at Shady Beach. For safety reasons, the LPA Lake Patrol and the Iowa DNR require boats anchored during the display to have running lights on during the show.

Planning for 2020 community celebrations has been unusually complicated due to uncertainty surrounding COVID-19. LPA, the Scheiring family and J&M Displays reviewed plans for the July 4 show in April and agreed to move forward with the event. J&M Displays has agreed to carry over all deposits and payments to 2021 if this year’s Fire in the Sky needs to be cancelled due to State protocols involving COVID-19.

The other type of fireworks is consumer fireworks, which now can be legally sold in Iowa because of a bill passed in the 2017 Iowa legislative session. In May 2017, the LPA Board of Directors passed a motion that states the LPA does not consent to the use of fireworks on LPA-owned property, such as beaches, campgrounds, parking lots, roads, the marina, golf courses and community areas.

Guests of Lake Panorama National Resort are being notified of this action. Both LPA members and guests can be found in violation of LPA rules if they use fireworks on LPA property and could be subject to a monetary fine.

LPA members also are reminded they are responsible to avoid any activity that could be declared a nuisance to their neighbors, and they are liable for any damage or injury they or their guests cause to neighbors and their property. 

PANDEMIC SEARCH FOR FLOUR BOOSTS SALES FOR PANORA FARM
Early Morning Harvest offers a wide selection of stone ground flours, meals, cereals and mixtures, which are milled from their farm-grown wheat, oats, rye, buckwheat and corn.

Posted 6/10/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times


Many small businesses have lost customers and revenue in the last three months as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet one Panora small business has been adding customers and hiring more help to keep up with demand for some of its products — especially flours made from organic grains grown on their farm.

Early Morning Harvest is a small family farm located just east of Panora. Jeff Hafner has been farming with his father, Earl, since 1993. The two transitioned their farmland to organic production in 2000.

The Hafners offer a wide selection of stone ground flours, meals, cereals and mixtures, which are milled at Early Morning Harvest from their farm-grown wheat, oats, rye, buckwheat and corn.

“Our flour products are made by using the whole grain and two stones,” said Jeff Hafner. “Our flour isn’t enriched or bleached or added to in any way. We simply use two pieces of round granite; one is stationary, one rotates, and the grooves in the stone push the final product out.”

Next, a sifter is used to create the different textures for each of the products. For instance, there is whole wheat flour, whole wheat bread flour and whole wheat pasta flour. Or consider corn flour, corn meal, corn polenta or corn grits. Several other flours and cereals also are offered.

The flour products are available in the Early Morning Harvest online store; in Hometown Foods stores in Panora, Guthrie Center and Stuart; New Pioneer Food Coop in Iowa City; and Wheatsfield Coop Grocery in Ames.

But most new customers who discovered Early Morning Harvest over the last three months purchased their flour on Amazon. In a mid-May interview, Hafner said in the last six weeks, the small business had shipped flour products to all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

“We used to mill one or two days a week, but lately we’ve been milling five to six days a week to meet demand,” he said. “People just couldn’t find flour in their stores.”

Jeff Coccoluto, from Boston, Massachusetts, wrote to Hafner in early April: “We are in Boston approaching our ‘spike’ in the COVID virus epidemic. In the last month leading up to this, our grocery stores have been run out of all the staples. I found whole wheat flour from you online, ordered it and got it delivered. My pizza and sour dough bread making continue on and taste better than ever.”

To prove his point, Coccoluto included a photo of a delicious looking pizza, and Hafner featured the photo and letter in one of the businesses’ weekly newsletters.

The flour normally is sold in one- and four-pound bags, but during the pandemic there has been more demand for 25- and 50-pound bags. “Two weeks ago, a gentleman who found us on Facebook drove from Indiana and left with 600 pounds of flour,” Hafner said.

While its flours have gained Early Morning Harvest new attention in recent weeks, it’s not how the small family farm first began connecting with consumers.

“I always wanted to have a big garden and enjoyed growing vegetables,” said Hafner. “But gardens mean weeds, and I didn’t like to pull weeds. That got me to thinking about the possibility of raising vegetables in an aquaponics greenhouse.”

Aquaponics combines aquaculture — raising aquatic animals in tanks — with hydroponics, which is growing plants in water rather than soil. Hafner started with a small system that has grown several times as he learned what works best.

His first water tank filled with tilapia was installed in March of 2011. He bought and developed several systems that worked well for his greenhouse. The systems pump the water from the fish tanks into basins where plants absorb the water and nutrients from the fish waste. The cleaned water cycles back to the fish tanks, only to flood the basins again later.

The entire system now involves 7,500 gallons of water and about 600 fish. This allows Hafner to reach his goal of year-round production of vegetables such as tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, several types of lettuce, kale, Swiss chard, collard greens and fresh herbs.

A large outdoor vegetable garden is planted each spring. In addition, a high-tunnel greenhouse helps extend the growing season, with planting in the early spring and later into the fall. These soil-based gardens make it possible for the farm to also offer vegetables such as beets, carrots, radishes, cucumbers, leeks and onions.

Hafner also sells live tilapia.

“We don’t have a license to filet the fish, so we sell them live. We have a couple of regular customers,” he says. The family also has pasture-raised poultry for egg production and sells the fresh brown eggs by the dozen in four sizes.

And the family sells both clover and buckwheat honey in one-pound and three-pound jars. Hafner works with an area beekeeper to manage the bee hives, which produce honey on the Early Morning Harvest farm.

Early Morning Harvest Kitchen Creations regularly available include cherry pecan granola, almond coconut pineapple granola, and Grandma Mame’s Cornbread Mix. A certified test kitchen makes it possible for the staff to try new ideas, dry herbs and spices, and bake fresh cookies for the on-farm store.

A wide variety of gift boxes and bags featuring items produced on the farm are available online or can be picked up locally.

Those who visit the Early Morning Harvest farm store also have the chance to purchase food items from other Iowa producers. Beef products come from Wallace Farms Beef in Keystone. Dairy items from four different vendors are offered. Zaza’s Pastas come from Cedar Rapids and are made with the general purpose flour produced at Early Morning Harvest. Salad dressings, mustards, salsas, and grape jelly also can be found on the store shelves.

Jeff lives at the Early Morning Harvest farm with his wife Shannon. His father Earl has been in agriculture most of his life and farming since the mid-1980s. His mother Ronda taught elementary school in the area for many years before retiring.

Besides the four family members who work in various aspects of the small business, there are three full-time and three part-time employees, plus an intern each summer.

Hafner offers tours to individuals and groups of up to 50 people.

“We’ve had bank tours, corporate health days, community college students, representatives of the World Food Prize and many others,” he said. “There isn’t a charge for tours. I’m not here to entertain; my goal is to educate people.”

Early Morning Harvest products can be purchased many ways. The farm is part of the Iowa Food Cooperative, which offers more than 1,500 products made, grown or raised in Iowa. Members of the cooperative order online bi-weekly with deadlines in place so producers can be notified of the products they’ve sold for that round.

Every other Thursday, Hafner loads up a large van with the products cooperative members ordered from Early Morning Harvest and drives to the coop’s headquarters in Des Moines. Since the farm serves as one of the cooperative’s pick-up locations, he’s back to the farm by 4:30 p.m. where local cooperative members have until 5:30 p.m. to pick up their order.

A weekly Early Morning Harvest emailed newsletter lists what’s currently available. Orders can be placed via email at info@earlymorningharvest.com. Items can be picked up in the store during open hours, or local deliveries are made each Friday to customers who meet Ronda Hafner in the Panorama Gardens parking lot beginning at 4 p.m.

Online ordering for items to be shipped can be done at earlymorningharvest.com. Product categories include wheat and flour, cereal and mixes, herbs and spices — fresh during some times of the year, dried year-round — and honey.

Hafner says he’s sometimes surprised more people in Panora and surrounding communities don’t know about Early Morning Harvest and what it has to offer.

“People looking online for farmers’ markets, Iowa-grown products or an Iowa experience of some kind often find us that way. We get a lot of people who drive out from Des Moines,” he said.

Early Morning Harvest is located at 2425 Willow Ave., just southeast of Panora. Store hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays. It is closed Sundays and holidays.

Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors Meeting

Lake Panorama Association
Board of Directors Meeting
April 28, 2020
Lake Panorama Association Office - Via Web Conference

The Lake Panorama Association Board of Directors met April 28, 2020, at 5 p.m. via Web Conference. Board members in attendance were Mary Jane Carothers, Emily Donovan, Gary Evans, Tom Jeschke, Rich Schumacher and Jim Spradling.
LPA Staff in attendance: Danna Krambeer and John Rutledge.
Visitors in attendance: Dave Finneseth and Scott Vandenbos, LPA Members
President Carothers called the meeting to order at 5 p.m.

Agenda Item 1 – Approval of the Agenda –
Evans moved to approve the agenda. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 2 – Open Forum – Scott Vandenbos addressed the board regarding the 10 MPH buoy location in Burchfield Cove. Vandenbos requested the buoy be relocated at the inlet of the cove, as it is in other cove areas. Vandenbos stated there are very few kayaks or other non-motor users of the cove now, due to the amount of boat traffic in this area. Vandenbos asked about the process to get the buoy moved back to where it was prior to 2019.
Rutledge reviewed the process the water safety committee and the Board of Directors used in 2018 to determine the locations of the buoys, including member input on the proposed locations.
The board thanked Vandenbos for bringing his concerns to the board. There were no new compelling issues that led the board to make any changes to the location at this time and the board suggested he attend the fall Water Safety Committee meeting and present his request to re-evaluate this buoy location. The Water Safety Committee is welcome to propose relocation of buoys to the Board for consideration.

Agenda Item 3 – Consent Agenda
Evans moved to approve the consent agenda. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.
Consent agenda to include:
a) LPA General Manager’s Report
b) Approval of minutes from 03.24.2020 LPA Board Meeting
c) Acceptance of 03.31.2020 consolidated financial report – LPA & LPN, LLC
d) Accept 04.13.2020 Building Code Committee Minutes
e) Approve date of the next LPA board of directors meeting
f) Accept 12.17.2019 LPN, LLC Board of Managers minutes
g) Correction to November 2019 LPA Board of Directors meeting minutes
h) Extension of board officer elections and committee appoints to June 2020

Agenda Item 4a – Sale of LPA owned lot 3662 as recommended by land sales task force.
LPA received an offer from Dale and Janis Hochreiter to purchase lot 3662 in the amount of $10,000. Land Sales Committee (LSC) reviewed the offer and countered back with $12,500, holding firm with the current minimum lot sales price policy. The buyer has accepted the counter of $12,500 for lot 3662. LPA staff has no objection to the sale of this property. LSC is recommending the offer of $12,500 be accepted. Offer states lot 3662 to be combined with currently owned lot 3661 at closing.
Schumacher moved to accept the offer and approve the sale of lot 3662 to Dale and Janis Hochreiter, for $12,500, lot to be combined with lot 3661 at closing. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4b – Sale of LPA owned lot 1572 as recommended by land sales task force
LPA received an offer from Jennifer Staver to purchase lot 1572 in the mount of $25,000. The offer is contingent on an acceptable percolation test. Land Sales Committee (LSC) reviewed the offer. This is a B lot, located on the golf course, along #6 tee box, red tees. LSC countered back with $30,000. The buyer contacted Guthrie County Environmental Office and was informed this lot had a bad perc several years ago. The buyer has accepted the counter of $30,000 for lot 1572, contingent on an easement for septic lateral fields on the golf course and an acceptable perc test in this location. LPA staff has no objection to the sale of this property. LSC is recommending the offer of $30,000 be accepted with the contingencies.
Donovan moved to accept the offer by Jennifer Staver of $30,000 for lot 1572 and an accompanying septic lateral field easement in the “no mow” area of the LPN golf course, contingent upon an acceptable percolation test by the buyers. Easement to be finalized by LPA management and LPA attorney, and be limited only to the ground necessary to accommodate the septic lateral fields. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4c – Variance Request: St. Thomas More for vinyl chain link fence as recommended by Building Codes committee
Excerpt from Building Codes Minutes:
Alex Kautzky represented St. Thomas More Center (lot 6657 and 6656 at 6177 Panorama Drive, Panora, Iowa 50216) and presented plans asking for a variance on a fence. Alex was asking for a 6-foot-tall, 215-foot-long privacy fence. Alex explained the importance of this fence was to keep kids from straying off a portion of Panorama Road and to block the view of people driving by from looking in the cabin windows. The Building Codes Committee discussed the importance of the safety of children and acknowledged the aesthetics of the proposed fence. The committee decided a 5-foot-tall, black vinyl coated chain link fence would meet the needs of Lake Panorama and St. Thomas More Center due to safety concerns and height recommendations. Nate Esser made a motion to approve a variance for a 5-foot-tall, black vinyl coated chain link fence. Motion seconded by Gary Evans. Motion carried unanimously.
It is worth noting St. Thomas More was platted as a large tract, which differentiates it from most other properties at Panorama, and their unique use of this property makes safety a consideration.
Spradling moved to approve granting a variance to St. Thomas More for a five-foot tall, black vinyl coated chain link fence based upon the fact St. Thomas More has unique safety considerations due to the nature of their operation and also due to the fact their property was initially platted as a large tract for commercial use. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 4d – 2020 financial investment in LPN, LLC (wholly owned subsidiary)
Rutledge reviewed the approved 2020 budget for LPA and LPN, LLC, which includes cash investment into LPN, LLC during the 2020 year. Rutledge requested the board approve authorization to make cash investments to LPN, LLC, when cash flow warrants the need, amount up to $100,000 during the year. If additional cash investment is required, a request will be made to the board.
Spradling moved to approve cash investments to LPN, LLC up to $100,000 as it becomes necessary for LPN, LLC cash flow. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 5a – Review COVID-19 policies
Policies related to use of LPA-owned facilities:
Sports courts were closed April 6, 2020, based on the proclamation of indoor/outdoor playgrounds were ordered closed. Upon further review, management believes we could open them with signage regarding social distancing and group size limits. The courts would be self-governing as LPA does not have resources to enforce social distancing. If members do not self-govern, we will need to close again to achieve social distance guidelines.
LPN Links will open to in-house dining Wednesday through Sunday, beginning May 6, following 50 percent occupancy and other requirements.
LPA office will remain closed to walk-in traffic until further notice. Bathrooms, campgrounds, and shelter houses will remain closed, per the Governor’s proclamation.
Policies related to lake use — consider potential rafting restrictions to comply with governor’s proclamation on social distancing and gatherings. Discussion was held and LPA will continue to remind members to follow social distancing and limiting of groups to 10 or under, etc. Rafting is discouraged, but not prohibited.
Policies related to collection of LPA dues and water bills: Collection policies were reviewed, and management will adjust as necessary due to COVID-19. Members with unpaid dues balances will not receive a ballot for the annual election June 27, 2020.
The board commended Rutledge and the staff in their handling of COVID-19 as it pertains to all the various departments regarding policies, procedures and practices and confirmed their support of the decisions that have been implemented.
Evans moved to adopt the recommendations reviewed, in regard to COVID-19 policies, and to give management authority to continue to handle as items arise. Motion seconded, carried unanimously.

Agenda Item 6a – Other Business – None

Agenda Item 7 – Closed Session – None

Adjourn - With no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 6:05 p.m.

ELECTRICAL HAZARDS BY THE WATER
The Electric Shock Drowning Prevention Association estimates at least 98 reports of electric-shock drownings since 1986.

Posted 6/10/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

Many Lake Panorama property owners have some type of electrical service near the lake. This power source is used for boat lifts, docks, irrigation pumps, lights or other items that require electricity to operate.

Yet electrical shorts, ungrounded equipment and frayed wiring all could cause dangerous, even fatal, swimming conditions. Electric-shock drowning happens when an electric current, typically low-level current from boats, docks or lifts, “escapes” and shocks nearby swimmers.
The Electric Shock Drowning Prevention Association estimates there have been at least 98 reports of electric-shock drownings since 1986. Many more people escape death but are affected and sometimes injured. The risk exists wherever there is both water and electricity.

A number of factors affect the impact the current can have on someone in the water, including the amount of electricity, the size of the person, and proximity to the power source. A person can be killed, injured, feel a slight tingling sensation, or experience nothing at all. Sometimes the shock alone can kill, and in other instances the shock causes paralysis, which leads to drowning.

Kane Powell is a licensed electrician who has been providing services to Lake Panorama owners for 20 years.

“Electricity and water are not a great combination, which is why it is so important to have the proper equipment and safety measures in place,” Powell says. “Water can be energized, and a person may not know it. If a person is in the water and there is electric current, the person can become disoriented and may not know which way is up. It doesn’t matter how strong you are; you may not be able to swim to the surface in a situation like that.”

Powell has plenty of experience installing electrical service near the water. He did all the wiring at the Lake Panorama marina for the most recent set of boat slips, which involved the pumps, lifts and lights.

Everything installed at the marina was guided by the National Electrical Code, a regionally adoptable standard for the safe installation of electrical wiring and equipment, and inspected by the State Fire Marshal’s office. That same code is used to guide electrical installations for private property owners.

“A person should never use any electrical outlets near the water that are not GFI or GFCI-protected and UL-listed for the purpose it’s being used for,” Powell says.

GFCI, which is an acronym for ground fault circuit interrupter, refers to a breaker that protects an entire circuit. These are generally found on electrical distribution panels and protect multiple outlets. GFI is a ground fault interrupter at the outlet, not on a panel. These are found in bathrooms or other locations where water might come in contact with an outlet. If that happens, the outlet is tripped and a simple push of the button restores the circuit.

Powell says there are many ways to protect an electrical circuit serving areas or equipment near water.

“I often install a UL-listed GFI receptacle in a UL-listed, weatherproof box with an in-use heavy duty weatherproof cover. That way if it trips, the owner doesn’t have to run to their house to get it back on,” he says. 

Using best practices means all dock wiring should be in conduit or protected from damage causing short circuits. That wiring should have ground fault interruption installed. Using hardwired extension cords as permanent wiring for electric boat lifts, docks or lights near water is not a safe practice.

“We do everything possible to make it as safe as it can be, so human error is somewhat protected,” Powell says. “If you plug an extension cord into a properly working GFCI, and the cord falls into the water, the GFCI is designed to trip in a split second.”

Even when electrical power is properly installed, Powell warns against having a false sense of security.

“A ground fault interrupter receptacle doesn’t last forever. I recommend properly testing it spring and fall. You can buy a plug tester and do it yourself or hire an electrician to check everything for you,” he says.

The Iowa State Fire Marshal’s office has authority over all electrical installations in Iowa and does permitting and inspections. The Lake Panorama Association does not require an LPA-specific permit for electrical work done within the lake development, nor oversee the installation and inspection process.

“LPA does strongly advise members to work with an electrician who is licensed in the State of Iowa,” says John Rutledge, LPA general manager. “Licensed electricians are required to follow all electrical codes, which includes securing the necessary permits and inspections from the State Fire Marshal’s office.”

In general, new electrical work needs to be permitted and inspected, while maintenance does not. Homeowners with electrical installation experience can do their own work, while those who don’t should hire a professional.

Iowaelectrical.gov is the go-to website for answers about Iowa’s electrical permitting and inspections process. In the “welcome” section on the home page, click on the State Fire Marshal’s link.

The State Fire Marshal’s office employs several state electrical inspectors. Steve Nisser is the inspector who handles Guthrie County. He encourages anyone with questions about what is needed for their particular electrical situation to call him at 515-210-7294.

LET’S TALK RIPRAPPING
What is it, and why does Lake Panorama need it?

Lanerumelhart bw
Lane Rumelhart
Posted 6/10/2020
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times


Riprap describes a range of rocky material placed along lake shorelines, bridge foundations, steep slopes and other structures to protect from erosion. The use of riprap at Lake Panorama was first raised at the 1983 Lake Panorama Association annual meeting when lakefront property owners were encouraged to riprap their shorelines.
A long-range planning committee of board members and volunteers held meetings in 1984 and into 1985. Its final report to the LPA board listed six objectives. Under lake quality, topics to be addressed were control erosion, siltation and water pollution. To control erosion, the report suggested several things including riprapping the lake’s shorelines.
In balloting at the 1985 LPA annual meeting, a resolution was approved requiring waterfront property owners to riprap their lots by Dec. 31, 1987. The LPA Building Codes provide specific instructions for waterfront property owners to keep their shorelines properly riprapped.

Lane Rumelhart has been LPA’s project manager since January and is in the process of taking over administration of LPA building codes from Mike Gliem. In this month’s Q&A, Rumelhart talks about riprap at Lake Panorama.

Q. Why is riprap important along the Lake Panorama shoreline?

A. 
LPA holds its members to a high standard of aesthetics and structural integrity around the lake. One of those areas is riprap. Riprap helps eliminate erosion caused by seepage on slopes or areas with concentrated flow. It is important to keep our shoreline in good condition to keep properties safe, attractive and secure. The quality of riprap varies immensely. Members who implement riprap correctly use landscape fabric and large boulders that are less likely to break down or wash away.

Q. Once a landowner has completed riprapping, how long can it be expected to last?

A.
The longevity of riprap depends on several factors. Those who use smaller material often will see a shorter lifespan of shoreline. In many instances, the rock is too small and disappears quickly due to water current, waves and neglect. Some lots are more challenging than others based on location, steepness and other variables.

Riprap does not move around solely due to waves. If you would like a good example, walk the shoreline of Boulder Beach and take a close look at the water’s edge. The boulders there have been pushed up by ice formations over the winters. Riprap deterioration isn’t just about wave action.

LPA has been asked whether the use of wake boats and the location of “No Wake” buoys are major factors in the lifespan of their riprap. Appropriately installed riprap should handle these conditions without issue. Those shorelines that do show wear from boat wake are generally those that utilized smaller stone and/or inadequately bedded landscape fabric.

Members should do a yearly inspection of their riprap. Things to look for include gaps exposing earth, vegetation growth and cracked/broken down rock material.

Q. Please summarize the building codes information related to riprap.

A.
Our building codes are designed to help members facilitate projects on their lots by either hiring a contractor or doing it themselves. Riprap projects often require special machinery to place the large rocks on the shore edge. This leads to most members seeking hired help to get riprap in place. LPA is fortunate to have many local contractors who do projects like these and know what is required. It is still good for members to know what is expected when completing a riprap project. LPA has a “Who to Call” list available for members looking for contractors to hire.

Land disturbing permits are required to be filled out when riprap is being worked on. This is the member’s responsibility to ensure LPA receives and approves a permit before work begins. There is no fee for a land disturbing permit, as these projects can vary greatly. The main reason for the permit is so LPA can be aware of all projects involving the disruption of soil around the lake. There is no need for a member to fill out a land disturbing permit if there is already a building permit in place with an erosion control plan.

Riprap specifications are detailed in the LPA’s building codes. There are a few major points. All lots immediately adjacent to the lake shall have riprap. Grade surface shall be smooth, firm and uniform. All dead and fallen material must be removed and properly disposed of. No concrete riprap is allowed above elevation of 1,045 feet, as above-water riprap must be large boulders, broken limestone, etc. LPA encourages members to go to the building codes on the LPA website and review what is acceptable for riprap material.

Q. In 2004, the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ) approved an $870,000 contract to riprap the upper basin. Is there a plan in place to address other LPA-owned property?

A.
Admittedly, LPA does not have perfect riprap on all LPA-owned property. We work to address repairs on a case-by-case basis and have a couple of large projects on the short-term schedule. Most notable is the LPA’s south shore. The south shore is a massive project, which LPA hopes to begin repairing and restoring this year. The project will not be a wholesale replacement of all riprap but rather a review of the full shoreline with key repairs as needed.

RIZ efforts are devoted to riprap on areas that are part of a functioning sediment basin, wetland outlet or lake inlet. RIZ funds are not used for properties that LPA could feasibly sell for private ownership. This distinction helps to ensure all RIZ funds are appropriated consistently with Iowa Code 357H.

Members with concern about an LPA-owned property should contact the LPA office. The property will be reviewed by LPA staff and a plan to repair the shoreline will be developed and implemented.

Q. What are other ways LPA and RIZ are working to improve the quality of Lake Panorama?

A.
LPA and RIZ work collectively to pursue the broad goal of water quality at Lake Panorama. Riprap is one important tool in this pursuit. But other efforts make our plan comprehensive. RIZ continues to build wetlands around the lake. These wetlands have several purposes. These catch sediment before it reaches the lake, therefore making less silt to dredge. These also filter the water and remove excess nutrients from agricultural runoff.
Another tool used to enhance water quality is boat inspections and an ambitious invasive species policy. LPA security prevents boats that may have invasive species from other lakes from entering through our shoreline. Collectively, these efforts serve to make the waters of Lake Panorama the best they can be.

NEW GUTHRIE COUNTY AUDITOR APPOINTED

Daniellefink bw
Danielle Fink
Posted 6/10/2020

At the Guthrie County Board of Supervisors meeting May 12, the board voted to accept the immediate resignation of Marci McClellan, who had been the Guthrie County auditor since being elected to the position in November 2016. McClellan cited health reasons for her departure.

The board then voted to fill the vacancy by appointment, and appointed Danielle Fink, the current deputy auditor. Fink already had declared herself as a candidate for the position and was the only person on the June 2 primary ballot for county auditor.

The county auditor is responsible for preparing and certifying tax levies, maintaining county financial records, serving as clerk for the county board of supervisors, and serving as commissioner of elections. As commissioner of elections, the auditor conducts voter registration and all elections within the county. This includes the annual election for members of the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ) board of trustees.

Guthrie County Courthouse and Panora City Hall reopen

Posted 6/10/2020

The Guthrie County Courthouse reopened to the public by appointment beginning Tuesday, May 26. County residents must first call the office they want to visit. An appointment will be made and the procedure and requirements explained. A staff person from the office will meet the resident at the east entrance and conduct a health screening before the resident can proceed to the appointed office.

The Panora City Hall lobby now is open for walk-in traffic from 8:30-11:30 a.m., and again 1-4:30 p.m. Hours are reduced to allow employees time to clean doors and counters. Only one person can enter the lobby at a time.

Vets Auditorium in Panora now is open to existing small groups that have previously used the building. Vets and the Panora Community Center will not be rented until the 10-person COVID-19 restriction is lifted.

LPA ANNUAL MEETING SET FOR JUNE 27
Two members will be elected to the LPA board of directors.

Lpa
By Susan Thompson
Posted 6/10/2020

The 51st annual meeting of the Lake Panorama Association will be Saturday, June 27, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Lake Panorama National conference center. The meeting was originally scheduled for May 9, but postponed due to COVID-19 prevention measures.

The new date was set by the LPA board of directors at its March meeting. LPA bylaws provide the annual meeting must be held no later than the last Saturday of June. To accommodate this scheduling change, the board also exercised emergency discretion to extend the board term of Tom Jeschke by one month.

Newly elected board members normally begin their terms at the May board meeting but instead will do this at the June 30 board meeting, three days after the annual meeting.

In addition to the later meeting date, LPA will make other necessary adjustments to ensure board members and attendees can participate in a safe, social distance environment. Spaced seating will be provided as well as a streamlined check-in process.

Live streaming options are being developed as both a backup plan and a supplemental plan, to ensure all interested members are provided an opportunity to participate. A late-June announcement of the meeting details will be issued by LPA and based on the restrictions in place at that time.

LPA generally encourages strong attendance at annual meetings. However, LPA members are reminded no business is actually transacted at the meeting itself. Members are allowed to vote in advance by mailing or dropping off their ballot. A full summary of the meeting will be available to the members via the weekly email bulletin.

Reports will be given by Mary Jane Carothers, LPA board president; Gary Evans, LPA board treasurer; and John Rutledge, LPA general manager and LPN, LLC director of operations.

An official announcement of the meeting will be sent to all LPA members in early June. Included in this mailing will be a ballot, plus a numbered envelope in which to return the ballot. Ballots must be returned in the numbered envelopes to ensure ballot authenticity. If an envelope is lost, contact the LPA office for a replacement.

There are no issues this year that require a special vote. The 2020 ballot is simply for electing two members to the LPA board of directors.

Members are asked to deliver or mail their completed ballot in the numbered envelope to the LPA office before Friday, June 26. This allows the majority of the ballots to be counted in advance of the meeting. Ballots also can be brought to the annual meeting.

Two people are running for two seats on the LPA seven-member board. Mary Jane Carothers is completing her first, three-year term on the board, and running for a second term. David Finneseth is seeking a seat on the board for the first time, and will replace Tom Jeschke.

The results of the annual election for the LPA board of directors will be announced at the end of the meeting, plus there will be time for audience questions and comments. n

PANORAMA DAYS CANCELED
One-day SummerFest event planned for Aug. 8

Posted 6/10/20
By Susan Thompson  |  Lake Panorama Times

In early May, the Panora Chamber made the decision to cancel Panorama Days 2020, which was scheduled for Aug. 7-9. In a statement, the Chamber said “due to the unknown and financial structure it takes, we feel it’s best to cancel this year and focus on planning 2021. This decision was not made lightly, but we feel this was the best decision for the safety of our community at this time.”

As state guidelines have become less restrictive, Chamber members are planning smaller events. For instance, on June 12, many Chamber businesses are offering special deals, gifts or giveaways, in an event called “Shop Local, Eat Local and Bank Local.”

On the weekend when Panorama Days would have been held, plans are underway for a modified event, which has been named SummerFest. On Saturday, Aug. 8, there will a day of food, music, games and shopping in Panora.

Also, the Lake Panorama Association sponsors the Panorama Days fireworks show and has agreed to continue with the Friday, Aug. 7 show. The show is scheduled to begin around 9:30 p.m. from the south shore of Lake Panorama.

The popular Heart of Guthrie County Garage Sales also was cancelled for 2020 and likely won’t be rescheduled this year since the event is a combination of retail store and home garage sales. But members of the Panora Chamber retail committee, which is made up of Crafty’s Coffee & Gifts, T & K Designs, and Fashions on 44, are looking at dates for a sidewalk sale in July, which they feel can be executed safely.

 The dates for the 2021 Panorama Days will be Aug. 6-8. To learn more about Panora Chamber events, visit its website at panorachamber.org.

Water testing ends

Posted 6/10/20
Provided by Lake Panorama Association


Changes in how the State Hygienic Lab processes Lake Panorama beach water quality samples means LPA no longer is able to offer weekly beach water quality reports.

LPA understands some members check these beach water quality results on a weekly basis. In light of this development, following is a history of testing procedures and how members can apply common sense judgement in lieu of State Hygienic Lab results.
LPA beach water quality tests have traditionally been taken on Tuesdays and shipped to the State Hygienic Lab. The results generally were available the following Thursday or Friday with LPA posting results by the weekend.

One flaw in this process was the delay in the testing data. Conditions on the preceding Tuesday may, or may not, have been indicative of weekend conditions at LPA’s beaches. If the weather leading up to the Tuesday test was clear and precipitation free, the tests were almost certain to come back as being “Swimming O.K.” If heavy rains occurred after the tests were taken, the results provided a false sense of security about the beach water quality.
The reverse also was true. If Lake Panorama experienced heavy rain on Monday and Tuesday, the tests were likely to come back as “Swimming Not Recommended.” However, clear skies on the days that followed most likely resulted in safe conditions by the weekend.

Lake Panorama members and guests should remember water quality can vary considerably from location to location. Conditions generally improve with sunshine and good weather. Rainy and cloudy conditions are generally followed by less desirable water quality conditions.

The presence of wildlife corresponds with poorer water quality. LPA uses its beach groomer to collect debris and wildlife droppings from the sand, which helps remove some sources of bacteria at the beaches. The result is never perfect but is substantially improved from what LPA offered before purchasing the beach groomer.

Lake Dogs and Cove Cats

Posted 6/10/20

Lake Panorama residents love their pets! Once social distancing rules are minimized, we will publish photos of owners and their pets with their stories. In the meantime, here are three featured pets:

Winston (nickname Mr. Kibbles)
Age: 8
Breed: F4 Bengal Hybrid (four generations from a wild Asian leopard cat)
Owners: Gerry and Carol Frank.

Winston’s favorite human food are green beans. He seemingly enjoys staring at his humans until they wake up. He also likes to dig through wastebaskets for new toys, his favorites toys being cheese stick wrappers and strips cut from mailer envelopes. His pet peeve is when his sister hits him on the head for washing her face. Winston does not enjoy car rides but does like to sleep high in his cat tree.

Issa (nickname Princess)
Age: 8
Breed: F4 Savannah Hybrid (four generations from an African serval)
Owners: Jerry and Carol Frank

Issa loves to caress Kate Spade leather handbags. (Gold is her favorite.) Her preferred human foods are blueberries and green beans. She likes to spend time rearranging stacks of paper. She enjoys car rides, especially outside her carrier, and sleeping just about anywhere. She never snores.

Dolly Parton
Age: 7
Breed: Pomeranian
Owners:  Alison and Jimmy Cate

Dolly’s favorite lake activity is anything that puts the wind in her fur. A cruise on a pontoon or a golf cart ride will do. As a diva, she’s much more interested in floating rather than swimming. Her biggest pet peeves are delivery drivers and doorbells, which provide even more reason to escape to the lake as much as possible. Dolly is preparing for her last summer as an only child before her first human brother arrives in late August.

Suggest Lake Panorama residents and their pets for us to cover on the Lake Panorama - Lake Dogs and Cove Cats Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LakePanoramaDogsAndCats

Scoop the Loop/Cruise for a Cause

The event features collection of items for the Food Pantry starting at 6:30 p.m. on Friday evening, May 29. Fashions on 44 will be collecting items all week and offering 10 percent off entire purchases with a donation. Crafty’s Coffee is also accepting donations on the day of the event. Crafty’s will feature Ice Cream Walking Tacos Friday night, and T&K has plans for the day pending. Event is organized by Retro LUX/Kellie Flanery with sponsorship by Wood Duck Landscaping Solutions and Karl Chevrolet. Friday also kicks off the first Farmer’s Market of the season. 
Screen shot 2020 05 27 at 7.38.58 am

'Scoop the Loop for Hope' yard signs

Remember or honor a loved one with a yard sign.  Your sign will be placed on your town’s main cruise strip for “Scoop the Loop for Hope” fun-night.

Date:  Saturday, June 6, 2020 at 6:30 p.m.
Main Cruise strips in Adair, Guthrie Center, Panora and Stuart.

Turn in your order forms by May 31 to one the businesses listed on the form.

Suggested Donation of $10 per sign.

These signs are in place of the luminarias  at the Relay For Life.  Plans are to still try to have a relay in the fall.
 

County Courthouse and Panora City Hall Reopen

By Susan Thompson
Posted 5/21/2020

The Guthrie County Courthouse will open to the public by appointment beginning Tuesday, May 26. County residents must first call the office they want to visit. An appointment will be made and the procedure and requirements explained. A staff person from the office will meet the resident at the east courthouse entrance, and conduct a health screening before the resident can proceed to the appointed office.

The Panora City Hall lobby now is open for walk-in traffic from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., and again 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Hours are reduced to allow employees time to clean doors and counters. Only one person can enter the lobby at a time.

Vets Auditorium in Panora now is open to existing small groups that have previously used the building. Vets and the Panora Community Center will not be rented until the 10-person COVID-19 restriction is lifted.
 

New Guthrie County Auditor appointed

By Susan Thompson
Posted 5/18/2020

At the Guthrie County Board of Supervisors meeting on Tuesday, May 12, the board voted to accept the immediate resignation of Marci McClellan, who had been the Guthrie County auditor since being elected to the position in November 2016. McClellan cited health reasons for her departure.

The board then decided to fill the vacancy by appointment, and appointed Danielle Fink, the current deputy auditor. Fink already had declared herself as a candidate for the position, and is the only person on the June 2 primary ballot for county auditor.

The county auditor is responsible for preparing and certifying tax levies, maintaining county financial records, serving as clerk for the county board of supervisors, and serving as commissioner of elections. As commission of elections, the auditor conducts voter registration and all elections within the county. This includes the annual election for members of the Lake Panorama Rural Improvement Zone (RIZ) board of trustees.